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I would an opinion about how you see the Repository pattern.

In the "old" Domain conception (for example from P of EAAA) the repository should be like an "in memory collection", so it should returns always the same type, so if you need a projection you have to make it out, so the projection will be made in the service layer for example, right? Or is possible to make it directly into the "Domain" project?

E.g.

public class CustomerRepository
{
    //Constructor accepts an IRepository<Customer>

    public IQueryable<Customer> GetAllDebtors()
    {
        //Use IRepository<Customer> here to make the query
    }
}

Instead, in DDD, the repository, especially combined with CQRS, can return directly the projected type because the repository becomes a denormalization service, right?

E.g.

public class CustomerDenormalizer
{
    //Constructor *could* accept an IRepository<Customer>

    public IQueryable<Debtor> GetAllDebtors()
    {
        //Use IRepository<Customer> here to make the query and the projection
    }
}
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

IMO, the correspondence with an "in-memory" collection is overemphasized. A repository shouldn't hide the fact that it encapsulates some heavy IO - that would be a leaky abstraction. Furthermore, IQueryable<T> is also a leaky abstraction since hardly any provider will support all the operations. I'd suggest delegating as much of the projecting as possible to the database, because it is quite good at it.

A projection in CQRS is somewhat different. It is usually implemented as an event consumer which updates a datastructure stored in some underlying storage mechanisms, which could itself be SQL server, or a key-value store. The central difference is that, in this case, a projection response to events from a message queue. These events could be coming from external systems.

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thanks, I don't mean that in the "old" approach the projection is not done, I mean that the service does it, not the repository, and it is possible if you pass an IQueryable<T>, without load the full object. I prefer that the repository make also the projection but I'm discussing with a colleague about this that is not agree. – Matteo Migliore Apr 4 '13 at 15:44
    
I'm not sure I understand what you're asking. Is the question whether you should use IQueryable<T> to make projections in memory? – eulerfx Apr 4 '13 at 17:14
    
My question is, in the "old" Domain approach, can I make the projection directly into the Repository, so I return different types of objects (based on the type of the projection) or is better to return always the "base" entity type and make the projection outside (e.g. in the service layer) where I use the repository. Obviously both approaches should not load the full object. So the question is: where is better to make the projection, from the design perspective? For me is make it into the Repository. – Matteo Migliore Apr 4 '13 at 17:24
    
If you're making projections in memory, then make encapsulate them in the repository. This way, the responsibility of returning projections is delegated to repository only and not spread among other classes. – eulerfx Apr 4 '13 at 23:24
    
+1 imho anything exposing IQueryable<T> is not a repository at all, just a bit fat wannabe. – jgauffin Apr 5 '13 at 6:06

Saying that the Repository in its "original form" has to return only objects of the same entity type is somewhat exaggerated. At all times people have been including Count() methods or other calculations in their Repositories for instance - and that's something that was documented even back in Evan's blue book.

On the other hand, I'm not sure what you mean by "denormalized types" but if that's types that borrow from several different entities to expose their data as is or consolidated, or expose partial views of single domain entities, I tend to think it's not the Domain any more. Oftentimes it turns out they serve application-specific purposes such as generating Excel reports or displaying statistics or summary screens.

If this is the case, and for performance reasons I want to leverage the DB directly instead of relying on the Domain, I prefer to create a separate project where I place all this "reporting" related logic. Never mind if you still name your data access objects Repositories in there (after all, they are also illusions of in-memory collections, only collections of other types).

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No, I think by denormalised this means fields from multiple DB tables (whether via views or not). – Chalky Jun 28 '15 at 10:09

In the "old" Domain conception (for example from P of EAAA) the repository should be like an "in memory collection", so it should returns always the same type, so if you need a projection you have to make it out, so the projection will be made in the service layer for example, right?

In my own solutions, I keep distinct the domain model (that is an C# expression of the language I learned from the domain expert, almost an internal DSL) and the applicative concerns related to the domain (such as repositories, that cope with the application need of persistence). This means that they are coded in different projects.

In such a structure, I've tried two different approaches: queryable repositories and custom ones.

  • Repositories that implement IQueryable have worked very well for developers using the domain to build UI or services exposed to third parties, but required a lot of work in infrastructure. We used different approaches on this side, from Linq2NHibernate to re-linq, each with pros and cons, but each one quite expensive. If you plan to use this technique, define good metrics to ensure that the time you save during application development worth the time you have to spend on custom infrastructure.
  • Custom repositories (those that expose methods returning IEnumerables) are much easier to design and implement, but they require more effort for UI and service's developers. We also had a case where using a custom repository was required by domain rules, since the query objects used to obtain results were specifications that were also part of the ubiquitous language and we were (legally) required to grant that the method used to query was the same used to express such value and predicate.
    However, in custom repositories, we often expose projective methods too.

Or is possible to make it directly into the "Domain" project?

It's possible, but when you have many different (and very complex) bounded contexts to work with, it becomes a pain. This is why I use different projects for the domain classes expressing the ubiquitous language and the classes that serve applicative purposes.

Instead, in DDD, the repository, especially combined with CQRS, can return directly the projected type because the repository becomes a denormalization service, right?

Yes, they can.
That's what we do with custom repositories, even without CQRS. Furthermore, even with some repository implementing IQueryable, we occasionally exposed methods that produce projections directly.

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From my point of view a Repository is a big part of the domain logic, e.g. CustomerRepository.GetAllGreatDebtorsOrderedByOlder() implements a business rule so I put them into the Domain project. Note that CustomerRepository does not inherit from any class, so it has not basic methods, but only "business methods". – Matteo Migliore Apr 6 '13 at 8:24
    
I'd suggest you to remove such business rules from the repository. Try something like: CustomerRepository.GetCustomerSatifying(greatDebtorsSpecification, OrderBy.Older). Relevant business rules should be part of the domain model. Note however that if such rules has no impact on the behaviour of other domain objects, it's not a business rule, it's an applicative concern! – Giacomo Tesio Apr 6 '13 at 8:32
    
I prefer a specific method of the repository instead of the Specification Pattern because is much more BDD oriented, inside to the method I can use the Specification pattern as I do now. Also because my Repository accept an IRepository<T> into the constructor so is agnostic to the persistance technology. – Matteo Migliore Apr 6 '13 at 13:16
1  
I agree with @GiacomoTesio business rules have no place in a repository. The repository should only be concerned with persisting/restoring domain objects. ALso, I think that a repository implementation should be very much aware of the underlying storage. A repository on top of another repository makes little sense to me. – MikeSW Apr 9 '13 at 18:03
  • Don't have generic Repository.
  • Don't have IQueryable.
  • Have ICustomerRepository.
  • Have your specific implementation of CustomerRepository leverage all the bells and whistles of the underlying storage system.
  • Have repository return projections.

    public Interface ICustomerRepository {

    public IEnumerable< Customer> GetAllCustomer()

    public IEnumerable< Debtor> GetAllDebtors()

    public IEnumerable< CustomerSummary> GetCustomerSummaryByName(string name)

    public IEnumerable< CustomerSummary> GetCustomerSummaryById(string id) }

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