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Another question answered me how concatenation of String literals is evaluated in compile time. In a project I'm working on we handle multi-line Strings of big queries using a StringBuffer. It appends just literals, so it had me thinking whether if something similar might happen.

In the following code, will the buffer append its contents at compile time? how would this behave when multiple threads are trying to execute this function?

 public static String querySomething(int arg){


        StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();
        buffer.append("A quite long query");
        buffer.append("that doesn't fit in one line");
        buffer.append("...");

  }

Wouldn't it be better to define the String as a constant since it would be thread safe and we know it can get concatenated at compile time with the plus operator. Something like:

  private final static REALLY_LONG_QUERY1 = "A quite long query that"
                                            +"doesn't fit in one line"
                                            +"...";
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2  
Since the StringBuffer is declared inside the method it won't come into account if this method is called by multiple threads at the same time. You can even replace it by StringBuilder and have the same behavior (with less overhead). –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 4 '13 at 13:47
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Wouldn't it be better to define the String as a constant ...

Basically, yes.

... since it would be thread safe and we know it can get concatenated at compile time with the plus operator.

These assertions are both correct.

However, you would not need to worry about thread safety any in the version of your code with a StringBuffer.

  • The StringBuffer class is thread-safe.
  • If the StringBuffer instance is only visible to one thread (e.g. the thread calling the method that declares and uses the instance), then the instance is thread confined and does not need to be a thread-safe data structure. (And you could use StringBuilder instead ...)

The primary advantage of the version that uses + concatenation of literals is that it takes zero time at runtime, and causes no allocation of objects ... apart from the one String object that represents the concatenated string constant that is allocated when your class is loaded.


In fact, in many places where people explicitly use StringBuilder or StringBuffer to "optimize" string concatenation, it either has no effect, or actually makes the code slower:

  • As you noted, the Java compiler evaluates concatenation of literals (using +) at compiler time, but it can't do the same thing for explicit StringBuilder.append calls.

  • In addition, the Java compiler will typically translate non-constant String concatenations (using +) in an expression into equivalent code using StringBuilder.

The only cases where it is worthwhile to use StringBuilder explicitly are when the sting building spans multiple statements; e.g. because you are concatenating stuff in a loop.

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I'm not worried about thread safety because I know that StringBuffer is thread-safe but would that mean that more memory will be allocated? One new instance per thread? –  Sednus Apr 4 '13 at 13:56
    
The StringBuffer version allocates a new StringBuffer object each time it is run ... unless you try to reuse an existing object. (And if you do that, you do need to worry about multi-threading ...) –  Stephen C Apr 4 '13 at 13:59
    
I mean StringBuffer ... corrected. –  Stephen C Apr 4 '13 at 14:01
    
So, will the contents of StringBuffer be concatenated at compile time or not? –  Sednus Apr 4 '13 at 14:08
1  
No it won't. The StringBuffer.append calls cannot be combined by the javac compiler, and I doubt that the JIT compiler will do it either. –  Stephen C Apr 4 '13 at 14:17
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I would prefer the second solution (merely using + operator).

Why? Because:

  • More readable
  • More functional (oriented functional programming, fashion and efficient today) avoiding useless (temporary) local variables and especially mutable variables (like buffer is).
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In the following code, will the buffer append its contents at compile time?

Yes.

How would this behave when multiple threads are trying to execute this function?

No problems, since each thread would use it's own StringBuffer (it is declared inside the method).

Wouldn't it be better to define the String as a constant?

Yes, it would make more sense here.

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In the presented case, the thread-safety offered by StringBuffer doesn't come into account since your first statement: each thread would use it's own StringBuffer. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 4 '13 at 13:50
    
StringBuffer thread safety is irrelevant - the variable is declared inside the method body, hence it lives and is accessible only in that method in that thread (unless passed further, etc). –  Dariusz Apr 4 '13 at 13:50
    
By each thread would use it's own StringBuilder does that mean that I will allocate a new StringBuffer per thread? How does that compare to the other alternative? –  Sednus Apr 4 '13 at 13:50
    
I know that the thread safety of StringBuffer doesn't come into play here, but figured I could add that info too. Nevermind, deleted the extraneous information. –  Keppil Apr 4 '13 at 13:52
    
@Sednus: Yes, therefore it makes more sense to use a constant in your example. –  Keppil Apr 4 '13 at 13:54
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StringBuffer fit better when you want to build a string which you don't know the actual size at compile time, for example:

public static String querySomething(int arg) {
    StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();
    while (...) {
       buffer.Append(someStuff());
    }
}

In your case, a constant is more suitable.

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StringBuffer doesn't build a string at compile time. –  EJP Apr 5 '13 at 0:24
    
Yes, I mean runtime... Thanks (corrected) –  Anthony Garcia Apr 5 '13 at 9:33
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