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I have a simple class:

class Test
{
    public static int Test<T>(T arg)
    {
        return 1;
    }
}

I would like to get an object of type Delegate that represents this method. Is it possible to create such a delegate? It would be even better if I could turn a method with any number of parameters and generic arguments into a Delegate.

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1  
What are you trying to achieve? How would you use such a delegate? –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 4 '13 at 14:09
    
@DanielHilgarth, I'm going to inspect it via Reflection and emit a code that invokes it. –  Impworks Apr 4 '13 at 14:10
1  
Why the delegate then in the first place? Why not inspect the method directly? –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 4 '13 at 14:12
    
So that I can have a single universal method, something like void ImportMethod(string name, Delegate code) that imports any kind of method into the system. –  Impworks Apr 4 '13 at 14:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't want to use a delegate here. You want a MethodInfo instance:

void ImportMethod(string name, MethodInfo method)

You would call it like this:

void ImportMethod("Test", typeof(Test).GetMethod("Test", ...Static));
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So the user will have to use Reflection to get the MethodInfo for the method? –  Impworks Apr 4 '13 at 14:18
    
@Impworks: Yes. You might be able to simplify this a bit by providing helper methods. –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 4 '13 at 14:20

If you write the method using generics to keep type safety, you will need to write two methods for each method having a different amount of input parameters, one for a void method (Action) and one for a method returning a value (Func). I threw in a helper class because it cuts down on number of generic parameters you have to pass for each method import. It also helps with intellisense when calling the method.

    public class Foo
    {
        public void Bar()
        {
        }

        public void Bar(string input)
        {
        }

        public bool BarReturn()
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    public class ImportHelper<TClass>
    {
        public void Import(string name, Expression<Action<TClass>> methodExpression)
        {
            ImportMethod(name, methodExpression);
        }

        public void ImportMethodWithParam<TParam>(string name, Expression<Action<TClass, TParam>> methodExpression)
        {
            ImportMethod<TClass, TParam>(name, methodExpression);
        }

        public void ImportMethodWithResult<TResult>(string name, Expression<Func<TClass, TResult>> methodExpression)
        {
            ImportMethod<TClass, TResult>(name, methodExpression);
        }
    }

    private static void TestImport()
    {
        ImportMethod<Foo>("MyMethod", f => f.Bar());
        ImportMethod<Foo, string>("MyMethod1", (f, p) => f.Bar(p));
        ImportMethod<Foo, bool>("MyMethod2", f => f.BarReturn());

        var helper = new ImportHelper<Foo>();
        helper.Import("MyMethod", f => f.Bar());
        helper.ImportMethodWithParam<string>("MyMethod1", (f, p) => f.Bar(p));
        helper.ImportMethodWithResult("MyMethod2", f => f.BarReturn());
    }

    public static void ImportMethod<TClass>(string name, Expression<Action<TClass>> methodExpression)
    {
        var method = GetMethodInfo(methodExpression.Body as MethodCallExpression);
        //Do what you want with the method.
    }

    public static void ImportMethod<TClass, TParam>(string name, Expression<Action<TClass, TParam>> methodExpression)
    {
        var method = GetMethodInfo(methodExpression.Body as MethodCallExpression);
        //Do what you want with the method.
    }

    public static void ImportMethod<TClass, TResult>(string name, Expression<Func<TClass, TResult>> methodExpression)
    {
        var method = GetMethodInfo(methodExpression.Body as MethodCallExpression);
        //Do what you want with the method.
    }

    private static MethodInfo GetMethodInfo(MethodCallExpression methodCallExpression)
    {
        if (methodCallExpression == null)
            return null;

        return methodCallExpression.Method;
    }
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public delegate int Del<T>(T item);
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This creates a delegate type, while I want an object of type System.Delegate. –  Impworks Apr 4 '13 at 14:15

It seems like Func and Action are what you are looking for.

You could use the following to get a "delegate object"

Func<int> func = () => Test<Foo>(bar);

You could use

void ImportMethod(string name, Action action)

or

void ImportMethod(string name, Func<int> func)

depending on whether you need the return value and register like this

ImportMethod("Name", () => Test<Foo>(bar))
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This way I lose the genericness of the method. –  Impworks Apr 4 '13 at 14:16
    
@Impworks I dont understand what you mean. You still have the generics when you are registering it, but in the method that calls the delegate it only cares that it returns a int. Or else you are probably trying to know to much in that method. How would you know what to pass in to each method? how to call them? –  Nick Freeman Apr 4 '13 at 14:19

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