Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone explain the behavior of the sort command with the character œ with a french locale?

$ file file.txt
file.txt: UTF-8 Unicode text, with CRLF line terminators

$ wc -l file.txt
4 file.txt

$ cat file.txt
cœz
coez
coe
cœ

$ sort file.txt
coe
cœ
cœz
coez

$ sort -d file.txt
cœ
coe
coez
cœz

$ env | grep -P "(LC|FR)"
LANG=fr_FR.UTF-8

The fact that "œ" is less or greater than "oe" seems random in the case of a regular sort, whereas the character is simply ignored in the case of a dictionary sort (sort -d).

I guess it has something to do with collation, but I'd like to have some insight here.

share|improve this question
1  
Are you sure you're in a French locale? What is the value of $LC_ALL? –  unwind Apr 4 '13 at 14:10
    
I am using cygwin under windows. LC_ALL is empty. The fact that is a french locale is my guess, how can I check it? –  Benjamin Toueg Apr 4 '13 at 14:12
    
If "œ" is exactly equivalent to "oe" then the results could be explained by instability in the sort. See what results you get when the -s option is given. –  Michael Burr Apr 4 '13 at 15:13
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Dictionary sort may be ignoring the œ ligature because it is not in the range a-zA-Z in ascii. (This is a guess).

Then in the French locale, œ and oe compare as equal, so they should come out in whatever order they went in, which is what seems to be happening to you. If that's correct, then if you put this in:

cœz
coez
cœm
coem
coep
cœp
coe
cœ

You should get this:

coe
cœ
cœm
coem
coep
cœp
cœz
coez

You can use the -c (check if file is sorted) or -r (reverse order) options to get more.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree for the dictionary sort. But I don't agree why œ and oe would compare as equal, and I wonder why this behavior has been chosen. Does anyone know that? –  Benjamin Toueg Apr 4 '13 at 15:45
1  
@btoueg, the behavior of the sort function is to match the pre-existing convention, it wasn't chosen by the implementor. Essentially because œ and oe are two different ways of writing the same thing - it is more of a typographical difference than a language difference. –  Ben Apr 4 '13 at 15:51
    
Indeed, ligature characters are ordered indifferently in the dictionary: fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/… However, you can see that ending accented characters are sorted: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… What's funny is that when you have duplicates, which does not happen in a dictionary, the order become completely random for the computer. This is not a behaviour you would want, because it is an information that you could leverage, for example spelling. –  Benjamin Toueg Apr 4 '13 at 17:12
    
@btoueg, Lines which are equal (but not identical) are not coming out in random order, they are coming out in the order they went in. This is correct according to the documentation. –  Ben Apr 4 '13 at 18:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.