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I have a function that takes a parameter p and then outputs a graph with plt.plot().

However I'd like to pass a list of many p values and have it plot all the graphs at the same time (e.g. like a matrix of graphs, I don't know what it's actually called. A sort of grid of many graphs). How can this be done?

For example this is my current function (simplified):

def graph(p):
    x = np.array(get x values from p here) #pseudocode line
    y = np.array(get y values from p here) #pseudocode line

    plt.title("title")
    plt.ylabel("ylabel")
    plt.xlabel("xlabel")
    plt.plot(x, y, 'ro', label = "some label")
    plt.legend(loc='upper left')
    plt.show()
share|improve this question
    
take a look at matplotlib.pyplot.subplots –  StuGrey Apr 4 '13 at 14:30
    
I couldn't get subplots working the way I wanted it to and figured it wasn't what I needed -- how would I use this properly to do what I need it to? –  Aruka J Apr 4 '13 at 14:31
    
Show us what you tried –  StuGrey Apr 4 '13 at 14:32
    
I wasn't able to try anything because I had no idea how to apply it to my current plots –  Aruka J Apr 4 '13 at 14:33
    
You want to look at the OO interface, not the state machine interface for matplotlib. You will get better help if you provide some base for the code in your question, even if it is just psudo-code –  tcaswell Apr 4 '13 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
def graph(p, ax=None):
    if ax is None:
        ax = plt.gca()
    x = np.linspace(0, np.pi * 2, 1024)
    y = np.sin(x) + p

    ax.set_title("title")
    ax.set_ylabel("ylabel")
    ax.set_xlabel("xlabel")
    ax.plot(x, y, 'ro', label = "some label")
    ax.legend(loc='upper left')

# Number of subplots. This creates a grid of nx * ny windows
nx = 3
ny = 2

fig = plt.gcf()
# Iterate over the axes
for j in xrange(nx * ny):
    t_ax = fig.add_subplot(nx, ny, j + 1)  # Add one for 1-indexing
    graph(j, t_ax)

plt.show()
fig.tight_layout()
plt.draw()

See here for guide on tight_layout

share|improve this answer
    
"name 'gcf' is not defined" (I am using import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ) –  Aruka J Apr 4 '13 at 15:09
    
should be plt.gcf(). I work in ipython with a whole bunch of stuff imported directly into the name space and some times I forget to re-append plt –  tcaswell Apr 4 '13 at 15:11
    
The text problems are still the same as the other answer -- the legends are big, axes numbers are big, titles overlap the axes of the graphs above them, etc. Is there a way to either autoscale the text when shrinking down a subplot like this or to add padding between graphs? –  Aruka J Apr 4 '13 at 15:13
    
yes, see link. If you have more problems, you should open a new question. –  tcaswell Apr 4 '13 at 15:17
    
That did the trick. Thank you! –  Aruka J Apr 4 '13 at 15:18

If you know how many plots you want, you can do something like this

def graph(p):
    x = np.array(get x values from p here) #pseudocode line
    y = np.array(get y values from p here) #pseudocode line

    plt.title("title")
    plt.ylabel("ylabel")
    plt.xlabel("xlabel")
    plt.plot(x, y, 'ro', label = "some label")
    plt.legend(loc='upper left')

    # Removed the show line from here
    # plt.show()


# Number of subplots. This creates a grid of nx * ny windows
nx = 3
ny = 2

# Iterate over the axes
for y in xrange(nx):
    for x in xrange(ny):
        plt.subplot(nx, ny, y * ny + x + 1)  # Add one for 1-indexing
        graph(p)

# Finally show the window
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this came really close! Is there a way to have it fix the scaling of the labels and axes and such? They seem to be the same size as before and it looks odd, but thank you for this so far! –  Aruka J Apr 4 '13 at 14:51
    
You really should grab the axes object that subplot returns, and then modify graph to be graph(p, ax) so you don't end up reliant on global state. –  tcaswell Apr 4 '13 at 14:55
    
and if you have a new-enough version of matplotlib tight-layout will fix some of the layout issues. –  tcaswell Apr 4 '13 at 14:56
    
@tcaswell I'm not a CS person, would you be able to explain more what you mean by that? Possibly with an example? –  Aruka J Apr 4 '13 at 14:57

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