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I'm learning iOS development through Stanford's iTunesU program. I am stuck on an unexpected problem I am having.

I have added a clear method, but I am getting this error //Use of undeclared identifier 'operandStack'; did you mean '_operandStack'?

I know I can fix the problem by using [self.operandStack ...etc instead of [operandStack

Why do I need self? Isn't it implied? Why do I not need to use self when referencing _operandStack?

#import "CalculatorBrain.h"

@interface CalculatorBrain()
//string because we are the only ones interested
@property  (nonatomic, strong) NSMutableArray *operandStack;
@end



@implementation CalculatorBrain

@synthesize operandStack = _operandStack;

- (void) setOperandStack:(NSMutableArray *)operandStack
{
    _operandStack = operandStack;
}

- (NSMutableArray *) operandStack
{
    if(_operandStack==nil) _operandStack = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    return _operandStack;
}

- (void) pushOperand:(double)operand
{
    NSNumber *operandObject = [NSNumber numberWithDouble:operand];


    [self.operandStack addObject:operandObject];

}

- (double) popOperand
{
    NSNumber *operandObject = [self.operandStack lastObject];

    if (operandObject !=nil)
    {
        [self.operandStack removeLastObject];
    }
    return [operandObject doubleValue];
}

- (void) clear
{
    //clear everything
    [operandStack removeAllObjects];

//*************************** //Use of undeclared identifier 'operandStack'; did you mean '_operandStack'?

}

- (double) performOperation:(NSString *)operation
{
    double result =0;
    //calculate result
    if ([operation isEqualToString:@"+"]) {
        result = [self popOperand] + [self popOperand];
    } else if ([operation isEqualToString:@"*"]) {
        result = [self popOperand] * [self popOperand];
    } else if ([operation isEqualToString:@"π"]) {
        [self pushOperand:3.14159];
        NSNumber *operandObject = [self.operandStack lastObject];
        return [operandObject doubleValue];
    }
    [self pushOperand:result];
    return result;
}
@end
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1  
Watch the lessons again before proceeding. They ARE very clear about that and you should grasp the concept of setters/getters vs. instance variable and get yourself comfortable with lazy instantiation which is used all the time throughout the course. –  Mario Apr 4 '13 at 19:27
    
Lazy instantiation is easy. I understand getters and setters and instance variables very well. What I am understanding though is we need to use self when referencing an instance method or property and we don't need to use self for _operandStack. In my C#/.NET background, this always referred to the current instance and could be used to access any object in the instance that was accessible. –  user1060500 Apr 8 '13 at 15:49
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1 Answer 1

Because you have synthesized it (note: in newer Objective-C version the synthesis is automatic) :

@synthesize operandStack = _operandStack;

It means that you generated getter and setter, and that you access the property by calling it _operandStack. If you want to call it operantStack change it to that:

@synthesize operandStack;

If instead you use self.operandStack, you are using the getter/setter generated by the property, not the synthesized one.

Using synthesized and not synthesized properties is different, there isn't a "recommended way" of accessing properties like many people think, they just have different meaning. For example here:

- (void) setOperandStack:(NSMutableArray *)operandStack
{
    _operandStack = operandStack;
}

You must use the synthesized property, otherwise you go into an infinite loop. The synthesized property is automatically generated, the non synthesized property is also automatically generated but it can be overridden, like you did in that case, and it can be also accessed externally.

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I'm about to give this answer :) +1. –  x4h1d Apr 4 '13 at 14:49
2  
A slight clarification might be needed. _operandStack (or operandStack when "@synthesize operandStack") is not an accessor but an instance variable. So the difference between prefixing with self or not is the difference between calling the getter and accessing the instance variable directly. –  aLevelOfIndirection Apr 4 '13 at 15:04
    
_operandStack is a DIRECT reference to the ivar (in the above example). The @synthesize (normally) creates two accessors: -(void)setOperandStack:(NSMutableArray *) and -(NSMuableArray *)operandStack. The use of self.operandStack will use the appropriate accessor depending on if it is on the Left Hand Side (LHS) or RHS of an assignment operation. Because the accessors that WOULD HAVE BEEN synthesized were implicitly implemented, the implicit versions will be used instead. The synthesize method does cause it to create an implicit ivar names _operandStack. –  bshirley Apr 4 '13 at 16:04
    
If ARC (Automatic Reference Counting) is being used, there shouldn't be a problem. If not, a setOperandStack: will not correctly retain the reference. Depending on how the class is used this problem may or may not show itself. –  bshirley Apr 4 '13 at 16:11
    
@bshirley Well thank you, I changed the terminology. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Apr 4 '13 at 23:10
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