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I have some classes with common properties, however, I cannot make them derive from a base type (LINQ-to-SQL limitations).

I would like to treat them as if they had a base type, but not by using Reflection (performance is critical).

For example:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
}

public class Vehicle
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Label { get; set; }
}

In this case I would be happy if I had the Id property available, regardless of the type I'm holding.

Is there any way in C# to to something similar to this:

public static int GetId<T>(T entity) where T // has an int property 'Id'
{
    return entity.Id;
}

I guess I could have used dynamic, however, I'm looking for a way to restrict the code in compile time from using this method for an object that has no Id property.

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2  
Are these generated classes? If so, they should be generated in the form public partial class Blah... which would allow you to create additional partial class files that would enable you to take advantage of the answers suggesting defining an interface. I have utilized the same approach with EF when using the repository pattern, for example. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 4 '13 at 15:02
    
just curious, why you are looking for a way to restrict the code in compile time. dynamic seems the best approach for this? –  Cuong Le Apr 4 '13 at 15:02
    
@CuongLe, he should not need to opt for dynamic unless the classes are truly closed to modification. Given that he mentions Linq-to-SQL, I suspect that he has more options than he realizes. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 4 '13 at 15:10

5 Answers 5

You can use interfaces:

public interface IHasId
{
    int Id { get; }
}

public class User : IHasId { ... }
public class Vehicle : IHasId { ... }

public static int GetId<T>(T entity) where T : IHasId
{
    return entity.Id;
}

However, if you are not able to modify the classes to add the interface, you won't be able to do this. No compile-time checks will verify that a property exists on T. You'd have to use reflection - which is slow and obviously not ideal.

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You can create an interface with the common properties and make your classes implement it:

public interface IEntity
{
    int Id { get; set; }
}

public class User : IEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
}

public class Vehicle : IEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Label { get; set; }
}

public static int GetId<T>(T entity) where T : IEntity
{
    return entity.Id;
}

You could simplify GetId like this:

public static int GetId(IEntity entity)
{
    return entity.Id;
}
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There is no way to guarantee a type has a given member without constraining to a common base type or interface. One way to work around this limitation is to use a lambda to access the value

public static int Use<T>(T value, Func<T, int> getIdFunc) { 
  int id = getIdFunc(value);
  ...
}

Use(new User(), u => u.Id);
Use(new Vehicle(), v => v.Id);
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The other answers mentioning the interface approach are certainly good, but I want to tailor the response to your situation involving Linq-to-SQL.

But first, to address the question title as asked

Can C# constraints be used without a base type?

Generally, the answer is no. Specifically, you can use struct, class, or new() as constraints, and those are not technically base types, and they do give some guidance on how the type can be used. That doesn't quite rise to the level of what you wish to do, which is to limit a method to types that have a certain property. For that, you will need to constrain to a specific interface or base class.

For your specific use case, you mention Linq-to-SQL. If you are working from models that are generated for you, then you should have options to modify those classes without modifying the generated model class files directly.

You probably have something like

// code generated by tool 
// Customer.cs
public partial class Customer // : EntityBaseClasses, interfaces, etc
{
    public int ID 
    {
        get { /* implementation */ }
        set { /* implementation */ }
    }
}

And other similar files for things such as Accounts or Orders or things of that nature. If you are writing code that wishes to take advantage of the commonly available ID property, you can take utilize the partial in the partial class to define a second class file to introduce a common interface type to these models.

public interface IIdentifiableEntity
{
    int ID { get; }
}

And the beauty here is that using it is easy, because the implementation already exists in your generated models. You just have to declare it, and you can declare it in another file.

public partial class Customer : IIdentifiableEntity { }
public partial class Account : IIdentifiableEntity { }
// etc. 

This approach has proven valuable for me when using a repository pattern, and wishing to define a general GetById method without having to repeat the same boilerplate in repository after repository. I can constrain the method/class to the interface, and get GetById for "free."

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Either you need to make both classes implement an interface with the properties you need, and use that in the generic constraint, or you write separate methods for each type. That's the only way you'll get compile-time safety.

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