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I'm coding a shell like bash for a student project. I need to make a perl auto tester of line commands.

my $cmd = "(echo \"foo\" | ./shell >& /dev/null)";
system($cmd);
if ($? == 35584) {
    print "SIGSEGV";
}
elsif ($? == 34304) {
    print "GLIB C";
}
else {
    print "GOOD";
}

I want to be able to hide the output on segfault or glibc.

@Marc B Okay, but my shell read on output 0, so i must have "echo" :s

@drquicksilver * glibc detected ./shell: free(): invalid pointer: 0x0000000000608291 ** OR Segmentation fault

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1  
remove the print statements? –  Marc B Apr 4 '13 at 15:01
1  
Which output is displayed? What exactly do you want to hide? –  drquicksilver Apr 4 '13 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

First of all, system executes sh, but you're using csh syntax.

my $cmd = "(echo \"foo\" | ./shell >& /dev/null)";

should be

my $cmd = "(echo \"foo\" | ./shell >/dev/null 2>&1)";

But executing shell can only interfere with your test. So let's avoid the shell entirely.

use Config   qw( %Config );
use IPC::Run qw( run );

sub sig_name {
   my ($sig_num) = @_;
   my %sig_names;
   @sig_names{ reverse split ' ', $Config{sig_num} } =
      reverse split ' ', $Config{sig_name};
   return $sig_names{$sig_num}
      ? "SIG$sig_names{$sig_num} (".($sig_num).")"
      : $sig_num;
}

run [ './shell' ], \"foo\n", '>','/dev/null', '2>&1';

if (my $sig_num = $? & 0x7F) {
   print "Killed by signal ".sig_name($sig_num)."\n";
} elsif (my $exit_code = $? >> 8) {
   print "Exited with error code $exit_code\n";
} else {
   print "GOOD\n";
}

What you call "GLIB C" is actually SIGABRT.

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Great its works :D I just have to do before: sudo su perl -MCPAN -e shell install IPC::Run –  Abdela Mohammed Apr 4 '13 at 17:57
    
But *** glibc detected *** ./42sh: free(): invalid pointer: 0x00000000006082b1 *** displayed again :s –  Abdela Mohammed Apr 4 '13 at 18:09
    
Maybe it writes it directly to the terminal. IPC::Run does allow you to create pseudo TTYs easily. –  ikegami Apr 5 '13 at 9:17

I try like that, but don't work.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;
use Config   qw( %Config );
use IPC::Run qw( run timeout );
use IO::Pty;

sub sig_name {
        my ($sig_num) = @_;
        my %sig_names;
        @sig_names{ reverse split ' ', $Config{sig_num} } =
        reverse split ' ', $Config{sig_name};
        return $sig_names{$sig_num}
        ? "SIG$sig_names{$sig_num} (".($sig_num).")"
        : $sig_num;
}

unless (-e -f "42sh") { die "Error: binary <shell> not found\n"; }
open(FILE, $ARGV[0]) or die "Error: cannot open file commands\n";
my $i = 0;
my $str;
my @line = <FILE>;
my $pty = new IO::Pty;
my $slave  = $pty->slave;
while ($str = $line[$i])
{
        chomp($line[$i]);
        run [ './42sh' ], \"$line[$i]\n", '>', $pty, '2>&1';
        if (my $sig_num = $? & 0x7F) {
                printf("%s ", sig_name($sig_num));
        } elsif (my $exit_code = $? >> 8) {
                printf("Error Code %3d ", $exit_code);
        } else {
                printf("Success ");
        }
        print $line[$i]."\n";
        ++$i;
}
close($slave);
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Someone have the answer ? –  Abdela Mohammed Apr 7 '13 at 14:13

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