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the ; before void was expected by the compiler. my real question is : I was able to enter the ID and the name but I can't see it in printf. Was it because my data was not recorded in the pointer? How to fix the problem?

#include <stdio.h>
struct data 
{
 int* ID;
 char* Name;
};

int main(void)
{
    struct data data1;
    struct data *data1Ptr;
    data1Ptr = &data1;
    printf("New ID:\n");
    scanf("%d",data1.ID);
    printf("Name:\n");
    scanf("%s",data1.Name);
    printf("The new ID is \n",&data1.ID);
    printf("The name input is \n",&data1.Name);

    return 0;
}
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closed as not a real question by casperOne Apr 8 '13 at 11:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I edited your code to make a bit more sense, you sound confused about the semicolon which simply terminates the declaration of struct data. –  unwind Apr 4 '13 at 15:18
1  
you use %d and %s in scanf to read a integer and a string, you have to use those format modifiers in the printf as well –  Fredrik Pihl Apr 4 '13 at 15:19
    
struct data need the entity for that member of pointer. –  BLUEPIXY Apr 4 '13 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

You're not using printf() correctly.

It doesn't magically handle formatting any arguments: you must tell it what arguments you're sending, and where you want their values to go, using format specifiers (starting with %).

You need:

printf("The new ID is %d\n", data1.ID);
printf("The name input is '%s'\n", data1.Name);

Also note that ID shouldn't be int *, it needs to store an actual integer so it should be int only.

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h> /* for malloc and free */

struct data 
{
    /*int* ID; why a pointer? */
    int ID;
    char *Name;
};

/* void main() Noooo */
int main(void)
{
    struct data data1;
    struct data *data1Ptr; /* unused */

    data1Ptr = &data1;
    printf("New ID:\n");
    scanf("%d", &data1.ID); /* scanf expects a pointer */
    printf("Name:\n");
    /* you have to reserve mem for name before */
    data1.Name = malloc(100);
    /* check result of malloc here */
    scanf("%s",data1.Name);
    /*printf("The new ID is \n",data1.ID); You forget %d */
    printf("The new ID is %d\n",data1.ID);
    /* printf("The name input is \n",data1.Name); You forget %s */
    printf("The name input is %s\n",data1.Name);
    free(data1.Name);
    return 0;
}

Note: If you declare Name as char Name[100] inside struct data there is no need to malloc

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You seem to have a number of issues here. First you chose to make Name and ID pointers in your struct. That means you need to dynamically allocate memory to both before you start using them:

struct data data1;
data1.ID = malloc(sizeof(int));
data1.Name = malloc(50); // so arbitrary amount big enough for a name.

I'm not sure why you chose to make ID a pointer, it doesn't have to be in this example and it would probably be easier to understand if it wasn't; so consider changing that.

Now scanf() takes a format string, and a number of pointers to each type being read. In your case you're just reading an int and a string, so what you have:

scanf("%d",data1.ID);
scanf("%s",data1.Name);

is fine, keep in mind if you choose to change ID to a int instead of a pointer you'll need to pass the address of it: scanf("%s",&data1.ID);

printf() takes a format string, and the data in the format to be printed. In you case:

printf("The new ID is \n",&data1.ID);  // you're giving the address of the int
printf("The name input is \n",&data1.Name); // and the address of the string

but you didn't provide any format... and you don't want to send the address of your pointers, that doesn't make sense.

printf("The new ID is %d\n",*data1.ID);  // %d for an int, and * to dereference
printf("The name input is %s\n",data1.Name); // %s for a string

What you wanted to do was use %d and %s for the int and string accordingly (just like with scanf()) but then since ID is a pointer, you need to dereference it before passing it to printf(). There is no "string" type in C, so when you tell printf() to expect a string, it just wants a char * which is what data1.Name already is.

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