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Is there a standard way to store (x,y), (x,y,z), or (x,y,z,t) data in python?

I know numpy arrays are used often for things like this, but I suppose you could do it also with numpy matrices.

I've seen the use of 2 lists zipped together, which side steps the use of numpy altogether.

XY_data = zip( [x for x in range(0,10)] , [y for y in range(0,10)] )

Is there a standard? If not, what is your favorite way, or the one which you have seen the most?

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Are you asking about spatial coordinates specifically, or any arbitrary data? –  Robᵩ Apr 4 '13 at 15:59
    
For me, I am asking about spatial coordinates. However, I am sure that if you have any information about either the internet community will be happy to learn. –  chase Apr 4 '13 at 16:08
1  
A side note: [x for x in range(0,10)] is identical to simply range(10) –  askewchan Apr 4 '13 at 16:10
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One nice way is with a structured array. This gives all the advantages of numpy arrays, but a convenient access structure.

All you need to do to make your numpy array a "structured" one is to give it the dtype argument. This gives each "field" a name and type. They can even have more complex shapes and hierarchies if you wish, but here's how I keep my x-y data:

In [175]: import numpy as np

In [176]: x = np.random.random(10)

In [177]: y = np.random.random(10)

In [179]: zip(x,y)
Out[179]: 
[(0.27432965895978034, 0.034808254176554643),
 (0.10231729328413885, 0.3311112896885462),
 (0.87724361175443311, 0.47852682944121905),
 (0.24291769332378499, 0.50691735432715967),
 (0.47583427680221879, 0.04048957803763753),
 (0.70710641602121627, 0.27331443495117813),
 (0.85878694702522784, 0.61993945461613498),
 (0.28840423235739054, 0.11954319357707233),
 (0.22084849730366296, 0.39880927226467255),
 (0.42915612628398903, 0.19197320645915561)]

In [180]: data = np.array( zip(x,y), dtype=[('x',float),('y',float)])

In [181]: data['x']
Out[181]: 
array([ 0.27432966,  0.10231729,  0.87724361,  0.24291769,  0.47583428,
        0.70710642,  0.85878695,  0.28840423,  0.2208485 ,  0.42915613])

In [182]: data['y']
Out[182]: 
array([ 0.03480825,  0.33111129,  0.47852683,  0.50691735,  0.04048958,
        0.27331443,  0.61993945,  0.11954319,  0.39880927,  0.19197321])

In [183]: data[0]
Out[183]: (0.27432965895978034, 0.03480825417655464)

Others will probably suggest using pandas, but if your data is relatively simple, plain numpy might be easier.

You can add hierarchy if you wish, but often it's more complicated than necessary.

For example:

In [200]: t = np.arange(10)

In [202]: dt = np.dtype([('t',int),('pos',[('x',float),('y',float)])])

In [203]: alldata = np.array(zip(t, zip(x,y)), dtype=dt)

In [204]: alldata
Out[204]: 
array([(0, (0.27432965895978034, 0.03480825417655464)),
       (1, (0.10231729328413885, 0.3311112896885462)),
       (2, (0.8772436117544331, 0.47852682944121905)),
       (3, (0.242917693323785, 0.5069173543271597)),
       (4, (0.4758342768022188, 0.04048957803763753)),
       (5, (0.7071064160212163, 0.27331443495117813)),
       (6, (0.8587869470252278, 0.619939454616135)),
       (7, (0.28840423235739054, 0.11954319357707233)),
       (8, (0.22084849730366296, 0.39880927226467255)),
       (9, (0.429156126283989, 0.1919732064591556))], 
      dtype=[('t', '<i8'), ('pos', [('x', '<f8'), ('y', '<f8')])])

In [205]: alldata['t']
Out[205]: array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])

In [206]: alldata['pos']
Out[206]: 
array([(0.27432965895978034, 0.03480825417655464),
       (0.10231729328413885, 0.3311112896885462),
       (0.8772436117544331, 0.47852682944121905),
       (0.242917693323785, 0.5069173543271597),
       (0.4758342768022188, 0.04048957803763753),
       (0.7071064160212163, 0.27331443495117813),
       (0.8587869470252278, 0.619939454616135),
       (0.28840423235739054, 0.11954319357707233),
       (0.22084849730366296, 0.39880927226467255),
       (0.429156126283989, 0.1919732064591556)], 
      dtype=[('x', '<f8'), ('y', '<f8')])

In [207]: alldata['pos']['x']
Out[207]: 
array([ 0.27432966,  0.10231729,  0.87724361,  0.24291769,  0.47583428,
        0.70710642,  0.85878695,  0.28840423,  0.2208485 ,  0.42915613])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I had not seen this before. So essentially using both zipping and numpy arrays together creates a different datatype called a structured array? What is the advantage of pandas over numpy? –  chase Apr 4 '13 at 16:12
    
I have not yet used pandas, but it is a bit more powerful for doing lots of different grouping and filtering on your datasets. If you are familiar with numpy methods and find them lacking, look to pandas, but I would start with plain numpy. Others will disagree of course :) –  askewchan Apr 4 '13 at 16:13
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