Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm studying OOP course (C++ is a base language) at university. My task is to implement own linked list template container class. I did it almost completely but faced with problem. It is known that STL provides iterator and const_iterator classes for iteration through list. They have almost the same implementation, the major difference is that iterator's methods return references while const_iterator's methods — constant references. I followed http://stackoverflow.com/a/3582733/2108548 and created separated template class ListIterator. Then I declared with typedef classes Iterator and ConstIterator inside the class List.

I got something like this:

template<typename T>
class ListNode
{
public:
    ListNode(T *node_value = nullptr, ListNode *node_prev = nullptr, ListNode *node_next = nullptr):
        value(node_value), prev(node_prev), next(node_next) { }

    T *value;
    ListNode *prev, *next;
};

template<typename T>
class ListIterator
{
    typedef ListNode<T> Node;

public:
    ListIterator();
    ListIterator(Node *node);
    ListIterator(ListIterator const &other);
    ListIterator &operator++();
// ...
    Node *i;
};

template<typename T>
class List: public Container
{
    typedef ListIterator<T> Iterator;
    typedef ListIterator<T const> ConstIterator;
// ...
    Iterator begin() const
    {
        return Iterator(m_first->next);
    }
    ConstIterator const_begin() const
    {
        return ConstIterator(begin());
    }
// ...
};

All worked great until I decided to make "copy-constructor" Iterator -> ConstIterator. So I need constructor method that gets ListIterator<T> (where T is the data class name) and creates new object type ListIterator<T const>. But in fact ConstIterator's constructor gets T const as a template parameter, so I need to remove const for constructor's parameter. I found header type_traits which does this. So I wrote "copy-constructor": typedef typename std::remove_cv::type NoConstT; ListIterator(ListIterator const &other);

But it doesn't work! I got this error after requesing const_begin():

List<int> list1;
list1 << 1 << 2 << 3;
int i = *list1.const_begin(); 

error: 'ListIterator<T>::ListIterator(const ListIterator<typename std::remove_cv<_Tp>::type>&) [with T = int; typename std::remove_cv<_Tp>::type = int]' cannot be overloaded with 'ListIterator<T>::ListIterator(const ListIterator<T>&) [with T = int; ListIterator<T> = ListIterator<int>]'

But that's not all. To accomplish my goal have to convert ListNode<T> to ListNode<T const> as well. But I have one more problem there: each list node contains pointers to previous and next nodes and if I try to initialize them in node's constructor I'll get recursion. Of course I can create function that handles converting all ListNode<T> nodes to ListNode<T const> by iteration through them. But I don't like this solution: it has huge overhead!

I asked this question my teacher. He couldn't understand it for several minutes, then when he got it he said: "It's elementary!" — "But I stuck with it for 3-4 hours!" — "If so, throw away const iterators and finalize list container without them. I need time to understand your code" (as you see my code is quite simple in my opinion). As I understood he didn't know answer to this question. But I really want to know how to make it! How can I solve this problem?

Sorry for tons of mistakes — I'm not a native English speaker.

share|improve this question
1  
Can you also add the main that created those errors? –  Alon Apr 4 '13 at 16:23
    
Have you looked at how this is handled for STL types? For instance, my implementation std::vector::iterator is actually a specialization of std::vector::const_iterator. –  Chad Apr 4 '13 at 16:23
    
@Alon updated error description –  rominf Apr 4 '13 at 16:33
    
after I changed it to const like my answer it worked for me –  Alon Apr 4 '13 at 16:36
    
Ok I added one solution.. I will visit it again after I get back from work –  Alon Apr 4 '13 at 16:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can indeed use <type_traits>, just not in the way you describe. One approach would be to always declare a constructor from the same type and declare from non-const one conditionally with enable_if only when template argument is indeed not constant. And node should always be non-const, this you can do with remove_const.

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
class ListNode
{
   //...   
};

template<typename T>
class ListIterator
{
    typedef ListNode<typename std::remove_const<T>::type> Node;

public:
    ListIterator() {}
    ListIterator(Node*) {}
    ListIterator(ListIterator const&) {}
    template <typename U>
    ListIterator(ListIterator<U> const&, typename std::enable_if<!std::is_const<U>()>::type* = nullptr) {}
};

template<typename T>
class List
{
public:
    typedef ListIterator<T> Iterator;
    typedef ListIterator<T const> ConstIterator;
// ...
    Iterator begin()
    {
        return Iterator(/*...*/);
    }
    ConstIterator const_begin() const
    {
        return ConstIterator(/*...*/);
    }
// ...
};

int main() {
    List<int> list;
    List<int>::ConstIterator ci = list.const_begin(); 
    List<int>::Iterator i = list.begin(); 
    ci = i; // works fine as expected
    i = ci; // fails as expected
    i = i;  // works fine as expected
    ci = ci;  // works fine as expected
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you a lot! It works perfectly! With this solution there is no need method const_begin. It's good too. –  rominf Apr 4 '13 at 18:26
    
This is wonderful, I knew there must be a better way to express mutable and immutable iterator types than propagating template meta boiler plates all over the class/time continuum. –  Jonathan Neufeld Dec 4 '14 at 18:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.