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I am making a program to allocate a 20x20 array of characters. Here is what I did:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main()
{
char *a=(char*) calloc(20,sizeof(char[20]));
a[0]="abcd";
printf("%s\n",a[0]);
return 0;
}

Link to ideone.

The output of the above code is (null). Can anybody please explain this? According to me, I am allocating a pointer a 20 spaces of size 20 each. So a[0] technically has enough memory to store "abcd", yet the output is null.

share|improve this question
4  
This code doesn't really compile. Enable compiler warnings: ideone.com/exEpiH. – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 4 '13 at 17:54
    
ignore the warning, I got a segmentation fault. I use g++ 4.7 – gongzhitaao Apr 4 '13 at 17:56
    
The string literal "abcd" was incidentally placed at a location whose address was a multiple of 256 is the most likely scenario. – Daniel Fischer Apr 4 '13 at 17:57
    
why have you compiled the code in C99 strict? – Dref D Apr 4 '13 at 18:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The type of variable a that you have is incorrect: it should be char (*a)[20] (yes, with parentheses).

This line is also incorrect:

a[0]="abcd";

you cannot assign C strings like that, because a[0] is not a pointer: it is an array of 20 characters, so you need to use strcpy instead:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main()
{
    char (*a)[20]=calloc(20, sizeof(char[20]));
    strcpy(a[0], "abcd");
    strcpy(a[1], "wxyz");
    printf("%s\n",a[0]);
    printf("%s\n",a[1]);
    return 0;
}

See the corrected program running here.

Note: Unlike C++, C does not require type casting of void pointers. It is typical for C programs to omit the cast of results returned from malloc, calloc, and realloc, because the type is already known from the type of the variable being assigned.

share|improve this answer
    
No. Don't use strcpy. ever. Use std::string. At the very worst, use strncpy. – SecurityMatt Apr 4 '13 at 17:54
    
strncpy(from, destination, count) is better than strcpy(from, destination) to prevent buffer overflow – Kevin Meredith Apr 4 '13 at 17:54
1  
@SecurityMatt: Question is (irritatingly) tagged as both C and C++... – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 4 '13 at 17:54
    
@SecurityMatt std::string is C++, this question is tagged as C. – dasblinkenlight Apr 4 '13 at 17:57
1  
@Kevin See the link to an answer in my comment above. Long story short, strncpy does not guard against buffer overflows because it does not null-terminate strings which are longer than the desired length. You need to add str[len-1]='\0', the way the OWASP people did in their example. This is error-prone. That's why there's strlcpy function fits in. – dasblinkenlight Apr 4 '13 at 18:40

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