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I'm writing a simple crawler in Python using the threading and Queue modules. I fetch a page, check links and put them into a queue, when a certain thread has finished processing page, it grabs the next one from the queue. I'm using an array for the pages I've already visited to filter the links I add to the queue, but if there are more than one threads and they get the same links on different pages, they put duplicate links to the queue. So how can I find out whether some url is already in the queue to avoid putting it there again?

share|improve this question
    
"array"? In Python? Do you mean "list" or "tuple" or "dictionary"? If you mean "array", which array implementation are you using? numpy? – S.Lott Oct 17 '09 at 12:34
    
I meant list... – Fluffy Oct 17 '09 at 16:36
    
@roddik: Please do not comment on your own question. Please update your question with additional facts. – S.Lott Oct 17 '09 at 17:35

11 Answers 11

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you don't care about the order in which items are processed, I'd try a subclass of Queue that uses set internally:

class SetQueue(Queue):

    def _init(self, maxsize):
        self.maxsize = maxsize
        self.queue = set()

    def _put(self, item):
        self.queue.add(item)

    def _get(self):
        return self.queue.pop()

As Paul McGuire pointed out, this would allow adding a duplicate item after it's been removed from the "to-be-processed" set and not yet added to the "processed" set. To solve this, you can store both sets in the Queue instance, but since you are using the larger set for checking if the item has been processed, you can just as well go back to queue which will order requests properly.

class SetQueue(Queue):

    def _init(self, maxsize):
        Queue._init(self, maxsize) 
        self.all_items = set()

    def _put(self, item):
        if item not in self.all_items:
            Queue._put(self, item) 
            self.all_items.add(item)

The advantage of this, as opposed to using a set separately, is that the Queue's methods are thread-safe, so that you don't need additional locking for checking the other set.

share|improve this answer
    
This runs the risk of reprocessing an entry after it has been popped. – Paul McGuire Oct 17 '09 at 11:24
    
Sure, you could store also the set of all items in the "queue" and modify _put to first check that set. It's protected by Queue's locking, so there are no race conditions. – Lukáš Lalinský Oct 17 '09 at 11:59
1  
This is so elegant. Very nice, even with the drawback of the first version. – e-satis Oct 17 '09 at 15:23
    
The same idea works even if you do care about the order—just use the OrderedSet recipe linked from the collections docs in place of set. – abarnert May 12 '13 at 11:08
    
Note this answer regarding overwriting the put method as well. – Yoel Aug 27 '14 at 13:04

The put method also needs to be overwritten, if not a join call will block forever https://github.com/python/cpython/blob/master/Lib/queue.py#L147

class UniqueQueue(Queue):

    def put(self, item, block=True, timeout=None):
        if item not in self.queue: # fix join bug
            Queue.put(self, item, block, timeout)

    def _init(self, maxsize):
        self.queue = set()

    def _put(self, item):
        self.queue.add(item)

    def _get(self):
        return self.queue.pop()
share|improve this answer

SQLite is so simple to use and would fit perfectly... just a suggestion.

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2  
With the added advantage of giving you persistence if you choose to use an on disk database. If you hit an unhandled exception you can fix the error and continue where you left off – John La Rooy Oct 17 '09 at 11:24
2  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – Makyen Jan 19 '15 at 22:03
    
This is as good as saying Using a if condition would fit perfectly..... N context to the question.. Using SQLite would slow down the whole process overalll – Mayhem Jan 21 at 6:16

The way I solved this (actually I did this in Scala, not Python) was to use both a Set and a Queue, only adding links to the queue (and set) if they did not already exist in the set.

Both the set and queue were encapsulated in a single thread, exposing only a queue-like interface to the consumer threads.

Edit: someone else suggested SQLite and that is also something I am considering, if the set of visited URLs needs to grow large. (Currently each crawl is only a few hundred pages so it easily fits in memory.) But the database is something that can also be encapsulated within the set itself, so the consumer threads need not be aware of it.

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use:

url in q.queue

which returns True iff url is in the queue

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Which doesn't help if it's be dequeued and processed already. – S.Lott Oct 17 '09 at 12:34

Why only use the array (ideally, a dictionary would be even better) to filter things you've already visited? Add things to your array/dictionary as soon as you queue them up, and only add them to the queue if they're not already in the array/dict. Then you have 3 simple separate things:

  1. Links not yet seen (neither in queue nor array/dict)
  2. Links scheduled to be visited (in both queue and array/dict)
  3. Links already visited (in array/dict, not in queue)
share|improve this answer
    
It is important to keep the list of all previously-queued entries (I'd use a set, not a list, not sure what @sam's problem is with set). If you just search the queue for duplicates, you may reprocess an entry that was previously queued and already processed, thus removed from the queue. – Paul McGuire Oct 17 '09 at 11:23
    
Yes, my answer assumed a second data structure in addition to the queue (hence things like 'in both queue and array/dict' and 'in array/dict, not in queue'). You add items to the 'seen' data structure before you queue them. You don't search the queue, you search your 'seen' array. By definition anything in the 'seen' array is either in the queue or already visited; neither of those cases need to be queued again. The main trick is making sure that the check-'seen'-and-queue-if-not-found is atomic. – Amber Oct 17 '09 at 12:15

What follows is an improvement over Lukáš Lalinský's latter solution. The important difference is that put is overridden in order to ensure unfinished_tasks is accurate and join works as expected.

from queue import Queue

class UniqueQueue(Queue):

    def _init(self, maxsize):
        self.all_items = set()
        Queue._init(self, maxsize)

    def put(self, item, block=True, timeout=None):
        if item not in self.all_items:
            self.all_items.add(item)
            Queue.put(self, item, block, timeout)
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instead of "array of pages already visited" make an "array of pages already added to the queue"

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Sadly, I have no enouch rating for comment the best Lukáš Lalinský’s answer.

To add support for SetQueue.task_done() and SetQueue.join() for second variant of Lukáš Lalinský’s SetQueue add else brahch to the if:

def _put(self, item):
    if item not in self.all_items:
        Queue._put(self, item);
        self.all_items.add(item);
    else:
        self.unfinished_tasks -= 1;

Tested and works with Python 3.4.

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This is full version of SetQueue

import Queue

class SetQueue(Queue.Queue):
    def _init(self, maxsize):
        Queue.Queue._init(self, maxsize)
        self.all_items = set()

    def _put(self, item):
        if item not in self.all_items:
            Queue.Queue._put(self, item)
            self.all_items.add(item)

    def _get(self):
        item = Queue.Queue._get(self)
        self.all_items.remove(item)
        return item
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Also, instead of a set you might try using a dictionary. Operations on sets tend to get rather slow when they're big, whereas a dictionary lookup is nice and quick.

My 2c.

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1  
This is incorrect, the set type is a hash table just like the dict type. – Lukáš Lalinský Oct 17 '09 at 10:48
    
exactly, that’s misinformation. sets are exactly as fast as dicts (maybe even faster, as no values have to be retrieved/stored) – flying sheep May 7 '13 at 19:19

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