Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The answer to this question How to compile/link Boost with clang++/libc++? states to build Boost with clang++ and libc++, the following should do:

./b2 clean
./b2 toolset=clang cxxflags="-stdlib=libc++" linkflags="-stdlib=libc++"

I tested the above tip on a Scientific Linux 6.4 x86_64 host and it works "mostly" building the full Boost 1_53_0 distribution, with clang++ 3.3sv and libc++ 3.3svn. I said mostly, as I really like to remove all libstdc++ dependency.

Nevertheless, the following:

  • libboost_graph
  • libboost_locale
  • libboost_regex

still shows libstdc++ dependencies (the ldd output makes it quite obvious). I would like to know a good way to remove such and would appreciate any hint.

share|improve this question
    
are you basically looking to statically link libstdc++? Or something else? –  alrikai Apr 4 '13 at 19:30
3  
On Linux you may be linking to libstdc++ to get the low level libsupc++ support, but I am not sure of that theory. There exist non-GPL replacements for this, search for libc++abi or libcxxabi. –  Howard Hinnant Apr 4 '13 at 20:08
    
@alrikai, Actually what I would like to do is to statically link libc++ so that I can run software implemented in C++11 on systems running older Linux, e.g. RHEL 5.x, 6.x. –  user183394 Apr 4 '13 at 21:58
    
@Howard Hinnant, Thanks for chipping in. I read about that on the libc++ Web site, but thought that I could skip it. OK, I will give it a try. –  user183394 Apr 4 '13 at 21:59
    
I took a closer look of boost_1_53_0/libs/regex/build a while ago while taking a short break from my daily work. I saw a bunch *.mak files. One of them is called generic.mak, the rest have names that have explicit association with specific compilers. OK. I will tinker with the generic.mak a bit and see what I can come up with. –  user183394 Apr 4 '13 at 22:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found out how to do it. Thanks to @Howard Hinnant for his mentioning of libc++abi. After RTFM http://libcxx.llvm.org/, it's trivial to build the entire boost libraries free of any libstdc++ dependencies. Yes, all I had to do is to RTFM!

share|improve this answer
4  
Well, we are glad you found the solution, but a general answer of the kind of "RTFM" isn't actually helping those who need a little bit more help than others. Do you want to at least point in the right direction (specific, not general, link, a section to look at, etc)? –  csotiriou Sep 28 '13 at 9:09
    
I subscribe to what is written above. –  Orient Aug 25 at 11:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.