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I am writing a game with the libGDX libraries and I have a situation where I have two bounding boxes, for collision detection, one for rotatable objects and one for those that are not rotatable. The rotatable inherits from the non-rotatable.

I want to make a game entity class which has common features like rendering debug shapes and animations and stores other game info relevant to all of the entities in the game. I only want to write on class from this and then extend that to produce all of the game elements but I can't think of a way of doing it because some of them will rotatable and others not. Now I had thought of simply having the bounding boxes as a global object but again I can't think of a way of constructing a global variable that can be of two types depending on how I instantiate the object.

Can anyone help? Or is what I'm doing just the wrong way of doing things?

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@jahroy Wikipedia! Horror! –  imulsion Apr 4 '13 at 18:48
    
Good luck to you. –  jahroy Apr 4 '13 at 20:10
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2 Answers

You could use composition instead of inheritance. So, for example:

class Box {}
class RotatableBox extends Box {}
class GameElement {
  Box box; // could be RotatableBox
}

You can then delegate any methods needed from the box so they are accessible from the game element directly.

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Except that the if it is a RotatableBox I can't access any additional functions. –  user1170304 Apr 4 '13 at 20:44
    
Maybe you should specify in your question that the child class requires additional methods ;) I think most people who read the question will make the same assumptions unless you provide more detail. Providing some example code always helps. Is there any way you can define an interface that will define the common methods? –  jahroy Apr 4 '13 at 20:46
    
Yeah, I think the question is terribly worded and I'm going to do it from the other way that is define an interface and then specify the bounding box. –  user1170304 Apr 4 '13 at 20:54
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Well...

Since you've accused me of providing false information in your comments (and claimed that you understand polymorphism), here is a simple example that demonstrates that you most certainly can invoke the methods of a child class even if the object is declared as the parent class.

class ParentClass
{
    public void sayHey()
    {
        System.out.println("I am a parent");
    }
}

class ChildClass extends ParentClass
{
    public void sayHey()
    {
        System.out.println("I am a child");
    }
}

public void testIt()
{
    ParentClass p = new ChildClass();
    p.sayHey();  // prints "I am a child"
}

The same concept applies to classes that implement interfaces.

In your game you can use an interface or a super class to represent either rotatable or non-rotatable game entities.

You can use a GameEntityFactory to generate objects of either type based on your needs.

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Does this work if I add a function in ChildClass called sayhello? –  user1170304 Apr 4 '13 at 19:53
    
If you do that, you will need to declare your object as a ChildClass (or cast) to invoke sayHello(). Honestly, don't you agree that it would have been pretty easy to try that on your own to find out? I urge you to spend some time learning the basics of Java. I am not going to continue this back and forth Q&A session any further. Good luck! –  jahroy Apr 4 '13 at 19:57
    
You're really not getting it. That's the whole point. I want to conflate two classes to one instantiated at run time. You don't understand the question at all and now it's most likely I won't get a decent response. I can only hope that you are a troll and someone is getting some pleasure out of this. –  user1170304 Apr 4 '13 at 20:01
    
@user1170304 - Sometimes when somebody doesn't get what you're saying, you should take a step back and make sure your description makes sense. I suggest adding quite a bit of detail to your question... Otherwise you probably won't get any responses (or responders will make the same assumptions I did). It seemed like a logical assumption that your different classes would implement/override the same methods. I still think your problem could be solved with a well designed interface, but I'm stepping away from this question. I've been trying to help, but we're not on the same page. Good luck! –  jahroy Apr 4 '13 at 20:37
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