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I am working on a game and I would like to abstract my ui, and bind unbind events based on various game states. But I can't figure out why this event is not being removed. It seems the scope is correct in the handler.

fiddle

relevant (stripped down) js:

var controls = {
    game : {
        el : null,
        cb : null,

        bind : function(el, cb) {
            this.el = el;
            this.cb = cb;
            this.el.addEventListener('click', this.handler.bind(this), true);
        },

        unbind : function() {
            console.log('unbind');
            this.el.removeEventListener('click', this.handler, true);
        },

        handler : function() {
            this.cb();
            this.unbind();
        }
    }
};

var manager = {
    init : function() {
        var c = document.getElementById('c');
        controls.game.bind(c, this.action.bind(this));
    },

    action : function() {
        console.log('c clicked');
    }
};
manager.init();

And yet if I remove the event this way it works:

(...)

bind : function(el, cb) {
    this.el = el;
    this.cb = cb;
    var self = this;
    this.el.addEventListener('click', function() {
        self.cb();
        self.el.removeEventListener('click', arguments.callee, true);
    }, true);
}

(...)

thanks

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

.bind returns a new function. this.handler.bind(this) !== this.handler! You would have to store a reference to the new function somehow.

For example, storing a reference in a variable and using a closure:

var handler = this.handler.bind(this);
this.el.addEventListener('click', handler, true);

this.unbind = function() {
    this.el.removeEventListener('click', handler, true);
}

As alternative to arguments.callee, you could also give the function a name:

this.el.addEventListener('click', function handler() {
    self.cb();
    self.el.removeEventListener('click', handler, true);
}, true);
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! Thanks for the quick response. I was unaware of .bind creating a new function. :) –  ceepee Apr 4 '13 at 19:01

Instead of playing with binding which also requires more memory I'd recommend using the following:

var song = {
    handleEvent: function (event) {
      switch (event.type) {
        case: "click":
          console.log(this.name);
          break;
      }
    },
    name: "Yesterday"
};

songNode.addEventListener("click", song);
songNode.click(); // prints "Yesterday" into console

You can use an object obj that has handleEvent property as a handler on any DOM object to catch its events and have event handler's context set to that object obj without the use of Function.prototype.bind.

That way you can also remove handlers, so

songNode.removeEventListener("click", song);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 good suggestion, though I don't think that one or two more functions have any significant impact on the memory footprint. –  Felix Kling Apr 4 '13 at 19:11
    
Thanks. Depends on how many objects will end up using the bound versions of function, but yeah, it's not the memory that is of main advantage here :-) –  gryzzly Apr 4 '13 at 19:14

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