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I would like to make a java script where it automaticly cycles through my functions every 5 seconds here is my code

function showlisten() {
   document.getElementById('listen').style.display = "block";
   document.getElementById('review').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('earn').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('listen-text').style.display = "block";
   document.getElementById('review-text').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('earn-text').style.display = "none";
}
function showreview() {
   document.getElementById('listen').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('review').style.display = "block";
   document.getElementById('earn').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('listen-text').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('review-text').style.display = "block";
   document.getElementById('earn-text').style.display = "none";
}
function showearn() {
   document.getElementById('listen').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('review').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('earn').style.display = "block";
   document.getElementById('listen-text').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('review-text').style.display = "none";
   document.getElementById('earn-text').style.display = "block";
}
share|improve this question
1  
setInterval – Andreas Apr 4 '13 at 20:53
3  
You are not using jQuery. Maybe you should, like you tagged ;) $('#listen').hide() is quite a bit shorter than document.getElementById('listen').style.display = "none"; – drquicksilver Apr 4 '13 at 20:55
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Pretty simple this one.

var clearToken = window.setInterval(function () {
    showlisten(); showreview(); showearn();
}, 5000);

Thanks to Dr. QuickSilver for spotting the true nature of the requirement. Updated below:

function showlisten(){
    document.write("listen<br />");
}
function showreview(){
    document.write("review<br />");
}
function showearn(){
    document.write("earn<br />");
}

showlisten();
window.setInterval(function () {
    showlisten();
}, 15000);
window.setTimeout(function () {
    showreview();
    window.setInterval(function(){
        showreview();        
    }, 15000);
}, 5000);
window.setTimeout(function () {
    showearn();
    window.setInterval(function () {
        showearn();
    }, 15000);
}, 10000);

I much prefer QuickSilver's approach to this, but duplicating the style would be redundant, so I have approached it differently to give you two ways of going about this.

I created a fiddle for it, but the site seems to be playing up for me right now: http://jsfiddle.net/jdjE5/ hopefully the link works for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and it goes to the final function and sticks there – Connor Cushion Mulhall Apr 5 '13 at 9:29
    
Look in your console, you probably have an unhandled exception occuring in your code somewhere. – Moby's Stunt Double Apr 5 '13 at 14:31
    
Console is blank? – Connor Cushion Mulhall Apr 8 '13 at 12:28
    
You need to post your full code. I can't really help you further unless you do. Could you make a fiddle? – Moby's Stunt Double Apr 8 '13 at 17:43
1  
@ConnorCushionMulhall is quite right, that will go to the final state and stay there. You won't see the effect of showlisten or showreview because showearn happens last and undoes everything they do; I presume a 5 second delay between each of the three states was what was wanted, see my answer. – drquicksilver Apr 9 '13 at 6:19

Do you want it to be in the 'listen' state for 5 seconds, then the 'review' state for 5 seconds, then the 'earn' state for 5 seconds, and then cycle?

If so, you need a chain of 3 setTimeouts:

function dolisten() {
   showlisten();
   setTimeout(doreview,5000);
}
function doreview() {
   showreview();
   setTimeout(doearn,5000);
}
function doearn() {
   showearn();
   setTimeout(dolisten,5000);
}

You could also possibly have 3 unrelated setIntervals on 15 second clocks but I'm not sure if they'd stay in sync and it's not really any simpler.

share|improve this answer

you're looking for setInterval() ;)

share|improve this answer

I should cache DOM Elements like:

function loopFunctions(){
   var elemListen = document.getElementById('listen'),
      elemReview = document.getElementById('review'),
      elemEarn = document.getElementById('earn'),
      elemListenText = document.getElementById('listen-text'),
      elemReviewText = document.getElementById('review-text'),
      elemEarnText = document.getElementById('earn-text'),
      functions = [
         function(){
            elemListen.style.display = "block";
            elemReview.style.display = "none";
            elemEarn.style.display = "none";
            elemListenText.style.display = "block";
            elemReviewText.style.display = "none";
            elemEarnText.style.display = "none";
         },
        function(){
            elemListen.style.display = "none";
            elemReview.style.display = "block";
            elemEarn.style.display = "none";
            elemListenText.style.display = "none";
            elemReviewText.style.display = "block";
            elemEarnText.style.display = "none";
         },
         function(){
            elemListen.style.display = "none";
            elemReview.style.display = "none";
            elemEarn.style.display = "block";
            elemListenText.style.display = "none";
            elemReviewText.style.display = "none";
            elemEarnText.style.display = "block";
         } 
      ],
      idInterval = setInterval(function(){
         for (var i = functions.length; i >= 0; i--) {
            functions[i]();
         };
      }, 5000);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is not particularly important. getElementById is fast. An optimisation like this is wasting your time unless you have identified it as a bottleneck. (More complex element selectors such as are often used in jQuery or Prototype are more likely to be slow and this might be good advice then - but even then, only if your page is large and th e selectors are executed many many times) – drquicksilver Apr 4 '13 at 21:15
    
getElementId is fast but are no reason to execute it 3x more then needed... – fernandosavio Apr 8 '13 at 17:48
    
There is a reason; everything is a tradeoff. Pros include that it makes the code shorter and easier to read as you don't have to go and check what the variable is. Cons include that if you change it you have to change it in multiple places. In jQuery in particular it's very common to see repeated use of $('#listen') style selectors and I would never hurry to factor them out unless it was happening in a tight loop which was causing identified performance issues. – drquicksilver Apr 9 '13 at 6:16

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