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I'm writing a MFC app to implement a client/server scenario and using Win socket for that. I can send/receive a small message e.g. "hello". Also, I tried with buffer of size 1000. However, when I increase its size further, it just hangs. Doesn't even throw any error.

Any idea about what the problem could be? Is there any restriction on the maximum size of buffer I can send/receive in winsock? I'm a newbie in this and never used winsock before.

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The maximum size a TCP packet can have is 64K. Trying to send a packet with that size, will most likely cause your packet to get lost. A packet around 1000 bytes should not be a problem however. Please post some code. –  Matt Apr 4 '13 at 21:19
    
I tried with 2000 bytes and it worked fine now. Didn't change the code for that. However, it fails for bigger data, say 9000 bytes. Also, when it hangs, I see "The thread 'Win32 Thread' (0x1bc0) has exited with code 0 (0x0)" on the output window of server app. –  pree Apr 4 '13 at 23:06
    
Got it :) there was some minor bug in my code and also, I wasn't actually receiving the data from server end. I was waiting for all data to arrive instead. Now I can receive the data, in multiple runs though. –  pree Apr 5 '13 at 0:25
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Are you using TCP or raw sockets? TCP does not, at app level, transfer 'packets' and so I cannot understand some of the other comments. Application buffer sizes greater than 64k are not uncommon, and will work fine. –  Martin James Apr 9 '13 at 8:23
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The fact that you receive a part of the data, then the remaining part, is covered in my answer to this question. It's basically the way TCP works. –  icabod Apr 16 '13 at 9:40

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The following comment by icabod replies this question.

"The fact that you receive a part of the data, then the remaining part, is covered in my answer to this question. It's basically the way TCP works. – icabod"

Thank you, icabod.

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