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Need help finding similar values in a SQL database. Table structure like:

    id         |        item_id_nm |      height |    width |     length |     weight
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1          |       00000000001 |      1.0    |     1.0  |        1.0 |         1.0
    2          |       00000000001 |      1.1    |     1.0  |        0.9 |         1.1
    3          |       00000000001 |      2.0    |     1.0  |        1.0 |         1.0
    4          |       00000000002 |      1.0    |     1.0  |        1.0 |         1.0
    5          |       00000000002 |      1.0    |     1.1  |        1.1 |         1.0
    6          |       00000000002 |      1.0    |     1.0  |        1.0 |         2.0

id obviously cannot have duplicates, item_id_nm can have duplicates (actually can occur many times aka > 2).

How would you form the SQL to find duplicate item_id_nm's but only the ones when the values of the height or width or length or weight differ by > 30%.

I know that it needs to loop through the table, but how do I do the checks. Thanks for the help.

Edit: An example of the %30 difference is included. the id = 3 with the height 200% difference from the 1.0 (or 1.1) of id's 1 and 2. So sorry for not being clear, but the 30% difference would be possible for each value of height, width, length or weight and if one of those have a 30% difference it would count as a duplicate of the other ones.

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you could use simple join to do that. and if you want to find count of duplicates you should use group by item_id_nm –  bksi Apr 4 '13 at 21:26
1  
Differ from what? The mean of each column? –  Wolf Apr 4 '13 at 21:32
    
Please give some example rows which have the 30% difference so that it is clear what exactly you want. You need to give more details in your questions in order to get accurate answers. –  Pavel Nikolov Apr 4 '13 at 22:30
    
Edited the question to be more specific. –  user1799107 Apr 5 '13 at 1:43
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should give you the rows differing by 30% or more from the average:

SELECT t1.*
FROM tbl t1
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT
         item_id_nm,
        AVG(width) awidth, AVG(height) aheight, 
        AVG(length) alength, AVG(weight) aweight
    FROM tbl
    GROUP BY item_id_nm ) t2
USING (item_id_nm)
WHERE 
    width > awidth * 1.3 OR width < awidth * 0.7
    OR height > aheight * 1.3 OR height < aheight * 0.7
    OR length > alength * 1.3 OR length < alength * 0.7
    OR weight > aweight * 1.3 OR weight < aweight * 0.7

This one should give you pairs of rows differing by 30%:

SELECT t1.*,t2.*
FROM tbl t1
INNER JOIN tbl t2
USING (item_id_nm)
WHERE 
     (t1.width > t2.with * 1.3 OR t1.width < t2.width * 0.7)
    OR (t1.height > t2.height * 1.3 OR t1.height < t2.height * 0.7)
    OR (t1.length > t2.length * 1.3 OR t1.length < t2.length * 0.7)
    OR (t1.weight > t2.weight * 1.3 OR t1.weight < t2.weight * 0.7)
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I think you could use something like this:

SELECT item_id_nm
FROM yourtable
GROUP BY item_id_nm
HAVING
  MIN(height)*1.3 < MAX(height) OR
  MIN(width)*1.3 < MAX(width) OR
  MIN(length)*1.3 < MAX(length) OR
  MIN(weight)*1.3 < MAX(weight)
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1  
Don't forget HAVING COUNT(item_id_nm)>1 –  Dan Ling Apr 4 '13 at 21:36
    
@DanLing if count()=1, then MIN()=MAX() so MIN()*1.3 is never < MAX() (unless it's value is negative... but it shouldn't be the case here)... anyway I suspect my answer is not exactly what the OP is after.. i'm still thinking... thanks –  fthiella Apr 4 '13 at 21:45
    
Edited the question. –  user1799107 Apr 5 '13 at 1:43
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SELECT
    *
FROM
    TableName
WHERE
   (height > 1.3 * width OR height < 0.7 width) OR
   (length > 1.3 * width OR length < 0.7 width)
GROUP BY
    item_id_nm
HAVING
    COUNT(item_id_nm) > 1
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It wasn't clear from the question if the 30% difference needs to be between width and height or width and length of the same row OR the corresponding width, height or length columns of two duplicates. It would have been way better if there were examples in the question. –  Pavel Nikolov Apr 4 '13 at 22:26
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I would use:

SELECT s1.id AS id1, s2.id AS id2
, s1.height AS h1, s2.height as h2
, s1.width as width1, s2.width as width2
, s1.length as l1, s2.length as l2
, s1.weight as weight1, s2.weight as weight2
FROM stack s1
INNER JOIN stack s2
ON s1.item_id_nm = s2.item_id_nm
WHERE s1.id != s2.id
AND s1.id < s2.id
AND (abs(100-((s2.height*100)/s1.height)) > 30
OR abs(100-((s2.width*100)/s1.width)) > 30
OR abs(100-((s2.length*100)/s1.length)) > 30
OR abs(100-((s2.weight*100)/s1.weight)) > 30)

With PostgreSQL (http://sqlfiddle.com/#!12/e5f25/15). This code does not return duplicated lines.

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