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abstract: I am looking to overload the apply_visitor() method in a class that contains a recursive boost::variant object.

In the code included below there is the method:

template <typename T>
ostream& apply_visitor(const T& fn) const

I would like to overload this method for different visitors. Something like this:

ostream& apply_visitor(const PrintData& fn) const

But the problem is that the class PrintData is not yet complete (see comments in the code below). It is defined after the Node class. So I have two questions (among others -- I would welcome a general critique on this code which is modeling something I'd like to put into production).

1) Is there a way to get apply_visitor(PrintData&) to work?

2) Can I rearrange the (recursive) variant so all visitor methods are in PrintData and I wouldn't have to add apply_visitor to the Node class?

/**
 * compiled with gcc (tested with 4.7.2 on linux)
 * requires the boost development headers to be discoverable
 * by the compiler.
 *
 * g++ -otest-recursive-visit -std=c++11 test-recursive-visit.cpp
 * ./test-recursive-visit
 **/

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

#include "boost/variant.hpp"
#include "boost/variant/recursive_wrapper.hpp"
#include "boost/variant/static_visitor.hpp"

using namespace std;

/// type name demangler (as implemented in g++). For other compilers,
/// we could add more #elif statements, but for now, just return
/// the mangled name.
#ifdef __GNUG__ /// compiler is g++
#include <cxxabi.h>
string type_demangle(const string& name)
{
    int status;
    char* res = abi::__cxa_demangle(
        name.c_str(), NULL, NULL, &status);
    string demangled_name((status==0) ? res : name);
    free(res);
    return demangled_name;
}
#else /// compiler is not g++
string type_demangle(const string& name) { return name; }
#endif

/// forward declaration of the Node class
/// (needed for recursive variant type)
class Node;

/// the actual recursive variant type
/// (typically hidden from the users)
typedef boost::variant<
    boost::recursive_wrapper<Node>,
    vector<int>,
    vector<float>
> data_t;

// forward declaration for PrintData. See note below concerning
// Node::apply_visitor()
class PrintData;

/// this is the object users will see
/// for prototyping, the tree object is public
class Node
{
  public:
    /// sub-nodes are identified by unique strings
    /// which point to one of the objects that data_t
    /// can hold
    map<string,data_t> tree;

    /// constructor for a std::map object, passed to tree
    Node(const initializer_list<pair<const string,data_t>>& l)
    : tree(l)
    {}

    //
    // INTERESTING PART OF THIS EXAMPLE IS HERE
    //
    // I tried to replace T& with PrintData& adding
    // a forward declaration at the top but I get the
    // errors:
    //
    //  line 86:
    //      invalid use of incomplete type ‘const class PrintData’
    //  line 53:
    //      forward declaration of ‘const class PrintData’
    //

    /// This is called by boost::apply_visitor(Visitor(),Node)
    //ostream& apply_visitor(const PrintData& fn) const
    template <typename T>
    ostream& apply_visitor(const T& fn) const
    {
        for (auto i : tree)
        {
            *fn.os << fn.prefix << i.first;
            i.second.apply_visitor(fn);
        }
        return *fn.os;
    }
};

/// the printing visitor to ostream object
class PrintData : public boost::static_visitor<ostream&>
{
  public:
    ostream* os;
    string prefix;

    /// keep a pointer to the ostream and keep
    /// a prefix string which will hold and "indent"
    /// which is something like "  " for every level
    /// of recursion
    PrintData(ostream& out_stream, const string& prefix_str="")
    : os(&out_stream)
    , prefix(prefix_str)
    {}

    /// recurse into the tree, adding indent characters to prefix
    ostream& operator()(Node& n) const
    {
        *os << endl;
        n.apply_visitor(PrintData(*os, prefix+"  "));
        *os;
    }

    /// actual data types that we want to print out
    template <typename T>
    ostream& operator()(const vector<T>& d) const
    {
        *os << " (vector<" << type_demangle(typeid(T).name()) << ">):";
        for (T i : d)
        {
            *os << " " << i;
        }
        *os << endl;
        return *os;
    }
};

/// convenience operator to allow: cout << node;
ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const Node& n)
{
    return boost::apply_visitor(PrintData(os), n);
}


int main()
{
    /// hooray for initialization lists!!!
    Node n {
        {"X", Node{
            {"a", vector<int>{1,2,3}},
            {"b", vector<float>{2,3,4}}
        }},
        {"Y", vector<int>{3,4,5}},
        {"Z", Node{
            {"A", Node{
                {"c", vector<float>{4,5,6}}
            }}
        }}
    };

    /**
    applying PrintData to n prints out the following:

    X
      a (vector<int>): 1 2 3
      b (vector<float>): 2 3 4
    Y (vector<int>): 3 4 5
    Z
      A
        c (vector<float>): 4 5 6

    **/
    cout << n;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Declare the function, but don't define it inside the class. Instead, wait to define it until after you've defined PrintData, at which point it will be a complete type.

class PrintData;

class Node
{
  public:
  ...
    ostream& apply_visitor(const PrintData& fn) const;
  ...
};

class PrintData : public boost::static_visitor<ostream&>
{ ... };

inline ostream& Node::apply_visitor(const PrintData& fn) const
{
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
That was the problem exactly, thanks! Sometimes I can't see the trees for the forest! Or is it forest for the trees? ;) Cautionary tale: don't forget the basics when dealing with complexity. –  Johann Apr 5 '13 at 12:42
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I had a similar problem and I used make_recursive_variant then I used map<Key,Value> for the variant instead of a Node class. And finally my node class became a utility function wrapping a std::map reference. Such as:

typedef boost::make_recursive_variant<
    std::map<std::string, boost::recursive_variant_>,
    vector<int>,
    vector<float>
>::type data_t;

// the printing visitor to ostream object
class PrintData : public boost::static_visitor<ostream&>
{
  public:
    ostream* os;
    string prefix;

    /// keep a pointer to the ostream and keep
    /// a prefix string which will hold and "indent"
    /// which is something like "  " for every level
    /// of recursion
    PrintData(ostream& out_stream, const string& prefix_str="")
    : os(&out_stream)
    , prefix(prefix_str)
    {}

    /// recurse into the tree, adding indent characters to prefix
    ostream& operator()(std::map<std::string, data_t>& tree) const
    {
        *os << endl;
        for (auto& i : tree)
        {
            *os << prefix << i.first;
            //you may want to change prefix and use new PrintData instead of *this
            boost::apply_visitor(*this, i.second);
        }
        return *os;
    }

    /// actual data types that we want to print out
    template <typename T>
    ostream& operator()(const vector<T>& d) const
    {
        *os << " (vector<" << type_demangle(typeid(T).name()) << ">):";
        for (T i : d)
        {
            *os << " " << i;
        }
        *os << endl;
        return *os;
    }
};


class Node
{
public:
    //implicit ctor for data_t conversion
    Node(data_t& data) : data(data) { }
    //...
private:
    data_t& data;
};

Edit: I forgot to mention that you dont need apply_visitor inside Node class anymore, but I am not sure about initializer_list ctor. It may not work with data_t types.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 That is an interesting solution. I assume you are using the variant to hold more than just a couple vectors. Can you comment on any issues you've come across with this design? For example, I found I had to use deque to hold large objects so references to specific elements would not be invalidated when the container was reallocated. –  Johann Apr 5 '13 at 12:46
    
I am building my structure at initialization of my application and beyond that behaves like a lookup tree. Therefore I benefit more from vectors in terms of locality of reference. Additionally I switched to boost v1.53 and its taking advantage of r-value references, which gives me ability to move my variants around without copying my vectors or vice versa (You can think of methods returning variants without copy cost). –  zahir Apr 5 '13 at 13:21
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