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So, in my java class, we were given these card and deck classes, which will be used for a card game later on. Here is the card code:

public class Card {

    // public constants:

    public static final int ACE     = 1;
    public static final int DEUCE   = 2;
    public static final int TWO     = 2;
    public static final int THREE   = 3;
    public static final int FOUR    = 4;
    public static final int FIVE    = 5;
    public static final int SIX     = 6;
    public static final int SEVEN   = 7;
    public static final int EIGHT   = 8;
    public static final int NINE    = 9;
    public static final int TEN     = 10;
    public static final int JACK    = 11;
    public static final int KNAVE   = 11;
    public static final int QUEEN   = 12;
    public static final int KING    = 13;

    public static final int SPADES  = 1;
    public static final int HEARTS  = 2;
    public static final int DIAMONDS = 3;
    public static final int CLUBS   = 4;

    // private instance data;

    private int rank;
    private int suit;

    // public constructor:
    public Card ( int rank, int suit ) {
        if ( rank < Card.ACE | rank > Card.KING | suit < Card.SPADES | suit > Card.CLUBS ) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        } else {
            this.rank = rank;
            this.suit = suit;
        }
    }

    /** Returns this card's suit. */
    public int getSuit() {
        return this.suit;
    }

    /** Returns this card's rank. */
    public int getRank() {
        return this.rank;
    }   

    /** Returns a stringy version of this card. */
    public String toString() {
        // Replace the next instruction with your code:
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
    }


}

And here is deck class code:

public class Deck {

    // private instance data;
    private Card[] cards;

    // public constructor:
    public Deck() {
        this.cards = new Card[52];
        int i = 0;
        for ( int suit = Card.SPADES; suit <= Card.CLUBS; suit++ ) {
            for ( int rank = Card.ACE; rank <= Card.KING; rank++ ) {
                this.cards[i] = new Card(rank,suit);
                i++;
            }
        }
    }

    /** Returns a copy of the card at the specified index in this deck. */
    public Card cardAt(int index) {
        if ( index < 0 | index > 51 ) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        } else {
            return new Card( this.cards[index].getRank(),this.cards[index].getSuit() ); 
        }
    }

    /** Shuffles this deck. */
    public void shuffle() {
        // Replace the next instruction with your code:
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException();

    }

    /** Returns a stringy version of this deck. */
    public String toString() {
        // Replace the next instruction with your code:
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
    }


}

My issue is that I am stuck on the toString method for both classes and the shuffle method for the deck class. Any help?

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what do you want as a result fo the toString() method(s)? –  Barranka Apr 4 '13 at 21:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The shuffle can be implemented as follows

 /** Shuffles this deck. */
    public void shuffle() {
       // Shuffle the elements in the array
       Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(cards));

    }

The toString simply builds a string and returns it. This can be anything you want to describe your class. Here is what I would do.

for deck

 /** Returns a stringy version of this deck. */
    public String toString() {
         String output="Current Deck:\n";
         for (int i=0; i <cards.length ; i++){
          output+= cardAt(i).toString();
         }
       return output;
    }

as for card, I'd change a few things. You assign a bunch of ints to represent the card, I would personally use an enum if you don't care about the values. This way cards that have values other than a number, ie a jack vs a 10, will be represented by their name, rather than some number. Who really ever says "i have a 12 of clubs". I'd change my stuff to this.

public enum Rank{ACE,TWO,THREE ....SO ON}
public enum Suit {HEARTS,CLUBS,SPADES,DIAMONDS}

you'd then change all of your get methods, but the real advantage comes in the fact you don't need a long switch statement to deduce the card NAME from the enum values. you can implement toString like this.

//change rank and suit type from int to the Enums
Rank rank;
Suit suit;

/*modify all your getters*/

 /** Returns a stringy version of this deck. */
    public String toString() {
        //enum will be printed out!

        return rank+" of " + suit +"\n";
    }
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