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Trying to write a file that reads from the first byte in a file to a byte specified by the user. I need help on the logic. If the file just has letters a through z and I just want to read and display the first 10, for example. here's a piece of what I wrote:

  char byte;
  inFile.seekg(0L,ios::beg);
  inFile.get(byte);
  cout << byte;

  for(int i = 0; i < num; i++);  //num is an int specified by the user.
  {
      inFile.seekg(1, ios::cur);
      inFile.get(byte);
      cout << byte;
  }
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What's your question? Is the code working? If not, what's the problem? – Barmar Apr 4 '13 at 23:14
3  
Your problem is probably that you don't need to seek forward 1 byte after every read. The get call already does that. Your code is probably skipping every second byte. Also, you're reading one more byte than you need because your loop goes from 0 to num-1, in addition to the get before the loop. – MatthewD Apr 4 '13 at 23:17
    
seek is for when you don't want to read sequentially from the begining of the file. – Keith Apr 4 '13 at 23:34
    
BTW, you should also consider checking for the end of the file... You could read this: cplusplus.com/reference/ios/ios/eof – Kupto Apr 4 '13 at 23:34
    
Do you want to skip a number of bytes or do you want to search for a byte value? – Thomas Matthews Apr 5 '13 at 0:59

First problem - the semi-colon on the end of the for() line:

    for(int i = 0; i < num; i++);
    {
        ...
    }

What the compiler sees is actually this:

    for(int i = 0; i < num; i++) { /* do nothing num times */ }

    {
        // code that will only run once
    }

So, remove the semi-colon.

Next, if you're just reading bytes in succession, there's no need to seek in between each one. Just calling get() will get the next byte in the sequence. So remove the seekg() calls.

Final problem - this function is actually calling inFile.get() a total of num + 1 times. The first call is before the for loop. Then in the for loop, get() is called num times (ie. i = 0, 1, 2, 3 ... num-1). You can fix this either by changing the for loop counter to (i = 1; i < num; i++) or just removing the get() call before the for loop. In the code below I've chosen the second way:

void run(int num, istream &inFile)
{
    char byte;

    for(int i = 0; i < num; i++)
    {
        inFile.get(byte);
        cout << byte;
    }
}
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