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Using properties I want a publicly visible getter and a privately visible setter for a object with weak reference. I thought that I had something that worked using a class extension. Well that is until I called the getter, both, before and after the setting the object to nil. The getter worked if I called only before or after the object is set to nil. Here is what I have:


Bar.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Bar : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, readonly, weak) NSObject *object;  // note only readonly
- (id) initWithObject:(NSObject *)object;
@end

Bar.m

#import "Bar.h"

@interface Bar ()  // class extension
@property (nonatomic, readwrite, weak) NSObject *object;  // note readwrite
@end

@implementation Bar

- (id) initWithObject:(NSObject *)object
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self)
    {
        self.object = object;
    }
    return self;
}

@end

main.c

#import "Bar.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    @autoreleasepool {

        // Call getter once, before setting the object to nil.
        // This appears to work.
        NSObject *object1 = [[NSObject alloc] init];
        Bar *bar1 = [[Bar alloc] initWithObject:object1];
        NSLog(@"before      - bar1.object[%p] object1[%p]",bar1.object, object1);

        // Call getter once, after setting the object to nil.
        // This appears to work.
        NSObject *object2 = [[NSObject alloc] init];
        Bar *bar2 = [[Bar alloc] initWithObject:object2];
        object2 = nil;
        NSLog(@"after       - bar2.object[%p] object2[%p]",bar2.object, object2);

        // Call getter twice, before and after setting the object to nil.
        // This appears to work to work for the first call to the getter.
        NSObject *object3 = [[NSObject alloc] init];
        Bar *bar3 = [[Bar alloc] initWithObject:object3];
        NSLog(@"both before - bar3.object[%p] object3[%p]",bar3.object, object3);
        object3 = nil;
        NSLog(@"both after  - bar3.object[%p] object3[%p]",bar3.object, object3);

        return 0;
    }
}

Results

before      - bar1.object[0x9623030] object1[0x9623030]
after       - bar2.object[0x0] object2[0x0]
both before - bar3.object[0x7523d90] object3[0x7523d90]
both after  - bar3.object[0x7523d90] object3[0x0]

I expected that for both after to be: both after - bar3.object[0x0] object3[0x0] .

It appears that the weak reference is not being set to nil when the getter is called prior to setting the object to nil and the again calling it again after.

share|improve this question
    
Fun fact, this only happens with clang's optimization level set to -O0. –  Carl Veazey Apr 4 '13 at 23:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you call the getter before, the weak property is being loaded and converted to a strong reference, which is then being autoreleased. When you call it again after, object3 is nil as expected, but the original object it referenced is still alive, sitting in the autorelease pool. Therefore bar3.object still has a valid object to return to you.

Try the following instead:

NSObject *object3 = [[NSObject alloc] init];
Bar *bar3 = [[Bar alloc] initWithObject:object3];
@autoreleasepool {
    NSLog(@"both before - bar3.object[%p] object3[%p]",bar3.object, object3);
}
object3 = nil;
NSLog(@"both after  - bar3.object[%p] object3[%p]",bar3.object, object3);
share|improve this answer
    
So that is what I suspected. The stack has a strong reference that will eventually be autoreleased, but has not by the time to the second call to bar3.object. –  mmorris Apr 4 '13 at 23:56
    
@mmorris: Well, no. The stack has already autoreleased it. The autorelease pool has a reference to the object that won't go away until the pool is drained. –  Kevin Ballard Apr 5 '13 at 8:21

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