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I'm getting started with learning subtree merging in git 1.8.2. I have created a simple example to test a change to a third party repo migrating into a main project.

I'm following the 6.7 Git Tools - Subtree Merging example.

The 'sub' project is included as a subdirectory in the 'main' project.

After I make a change to the 'sub' project, git reports a conflict when I try to merge the change into the 'main' project.

Test Summary

  1. Created repos for projects 'main' and 'sub' (sub instead of rack)
  2. Add remote named sub_remote to main that refers to sub
  3. Track sub_remote using sub_branch
  4. Change and commit one line in a file in the 'sub' project
  5. Pull changes from sub over to main/sub_branch
  6. Merge main/sub_branch into main/master.

The merge fails with a conflict. Merge is confused about which version of the changed line to keep.

<<<<<<< HEAD
main
=======
main upstream change
>>>>>>> sub_branch
main.git
sub
sub.git
tm

Complete Test Script

#!/bin/sh

# initialize empty repos
for i in main sub
do
  rm -rf $i{,.git}
  mkdir $i.git
  cd $i.git;
  git --bare init;
  cd ..;
  git clone $i.git
  cd $i
  echo $i > readme.md
  git add readme.md
  git commit -a -m "added readme.md"
  git push origin master
  cd ..
done

# add data to sub
ls > sub/data
cd sub
git add data
git commit -m "Added data"
git push origin master
cd ..

# add sub as a sub-tree in main
cd main
git remote add sub_remote ../sub.git
git fetch sub_remote
git checkout -b sub_branch sub_remote/master
git checkout master
git read-tree --prefix=sub/ -u sub_branch
git commit -m "Added sub"
git push origin master
cd ..

# make change to sub
cd sub
sed -i -e 's/main$/main upstream change/' data
git commit -a -m "upstream change made to data"
git push origin master
cd ..

# merge sub change to main
cd main
git checkout sub_branch
git pull

#merge sub_branch changes into master
git checkout master
git merge -s subtree sub_branch
cat sub/data
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1 Answer 1

What read-tree is doing in this case is just adding to a directory in your current tree the contents of another tree. This contents are added just like regular file and directories being created and added, there is no history carried over. All these files will be treated as if you created them.

When you try to merge the process fails since it sees that sub_branch history created the data file, and the target directory also contain a different data file created by you.

The page you are using is missing a very important step to make subtree works properly, so that you can actually be able to pull updates to it.

The proper example can be seen in both these pages: https://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/howto/using-merge-subtree.html https://help.github.com/articles/working-with-subtree-merge

What it is missing in your case is to properly link the history when you create the subtree:

# create the merge record but not change anything in your tree yet
git merge -s ours --no-commit sub_branch
# bring the changes and place them in the proper subdirectory
git read-tree --prefix=sub/ -u sub_branch

After this your main repository will contain the history of the sub repository. Calls to the merge that was failing should now work properly. Calling git log --graph will let you see how the different commits are being merged.

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