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public class FindSum
{
private static int sum(int n)
{
if (n==1)
return 1;
else
return n + sum (n-1);
}
public static int getSum(int n)
{
if (n>0)
return sum(n);
else
{
throw new IllegalArgumentException
("Error: n must be positive");
}
}
}

According to my book, this tests that n>0 before execution. I don't understand why that would be the case if the test "if (n>0)" comes after the algorithm. Shouldn't the two methods be flipped in order to accomplish this test?

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2 Answers 2

The order they're written in doesn't matter, but rather the order of execution is critical.

Since getSum explicitly calls sum if the check is successful, then there's no worry about that check getting missed, so long as you call getSum.

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Wow. For some reason I didn't think about that. Thanks! –  K G Apr 5 '13 at 0:20

In Java, the order the methods are in the class does not matter. notice that getSum() is calling sum().

So consider what would happen if we called getSum(0)? The if condition would fail and nothing would happen, we would go straight to the error. What if we called getSum(5)? Then we would return sum(5). But what is sum(5)? Now we find ourselves in the sum() method where we do our recursion stuff until we reach the base case, where we will finally return 1 + 14.

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