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I have registered a custom model binder for MyList in global.asax. However the model binder does not fire for nested properties, for simple types it works fine. In the example below, it fires for Index() but not does not fire for Index2()

Global.asax

protected void Application_Start()
{
    AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();

    ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(MyList), new MyListBinder());

    WebApiConfig.Register(GlobalConfiguration.Configuration);
    FilterConfig.RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
    RouteConfig.RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);
}

Code:

public class MyListBinder : IModelBinder
{
    public object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        return new MyList();
    }
}

public class MyList
{
    public List<int> items { get; set; }
}

public class MyListWrapper
{
    public MyList listItems { get; set; }
}

public class TestController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index(MyList list)  // ModelBinder fires :-)
    {            
        return View();
    }

    public ActionResult Index2(MyListWrapper wrapper) // ModelBinder does not fire! :-(
    {
        return View();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you found the solution for this problem? – Rosdi Kasim Mar 1 '14 at 14:35

Your model binder is matched with your MyList class, not with MyListWrapper. MyListBinder is only used with MyList class or a class which inherited from MyClass.

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Please add comments under the question and not as an answer. – newbie Apr 28 '13 at 6:00

Model binders are used to allow actions to accept complex object types as parameters. These complex types should be generated via POST requests, for example, by submitting a form. If you have a highly complex object that cannot be binded by the default model binder (or it wouldn't be effective), you can use custom model binders.

To answer your question: if you don't add a custom model binder for the MyListWrapper class too, the BindModel(of the MyListBinder)won't be called in a GET request, this is how ASP.NET MVC works. However, if you modify your code by adding a POST action with the MyListWrapper parameter, you can see that the BindModel method is called properly.

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult Index2()  // ModelBinder doesn't fire
{
    return View();
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index2(MyListWrapper wrapper) // ModelBinder fires
{
    return View();
}

And the Index2 view

@model fun.web.MyListWrapper

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.HiddenFor(m => m.listItems)
    <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
}

If you'd like "control" the action parameters in a GET request, you should use action filters.

share|improve this answer
    
in a POST request too the binder won't fire unless I add binder for MyListWrapper too right ? – newbie Apr 10 '13 at 22:27
    
I tried that, even with a binder for MyListWrapper, in both GET and POST requests the MyListWrapper binder gets fired but MyListBinder does not fires – newbie Apr 10 '13 at 22:32
    
The point is not get or post but that the binder must be registrated otherwise the mvc framework will nit know about it...Therevarevseveral way to do this the best way is to register your model binder JUST for a single data type your MyList...as suggested in other answers. – Francesco Abbruzzese Apr 14 '13 at 14:08
    
I know, the original answer talks about a distinction between a GET and POST request, I'm making a point that it doesn't work either way so it doesn't matter. – newbie Apr 28 '13 at 6:01

Add this to your global:

ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(MyListWrapper), new MyListWrapperBinder());

And then create a MyListWrapperBinder that can handle the binding.

share|improve this answer
1  
The question is about firing it when a custom type is a property of another type. – newbie Apr 28 '13 at 5:56
1  
Bottom line is you need a ModelBinder for whatever type is being passed to your ActionMethod. – Facio Ratio Apr 29 '13 at 4:52

You defined binder for MyList, so it triggers only when action method input parameter is of type MyList.

ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(MyList), new MyListBinder());

If you want model binder to trigger even when your MyList is nested into other model, you have to do this:

[ModelBinder(typeof(MyListBinder))] 
public class MyList
{
    public List<int> items { get; set; }
}

Then, model binder triggers whenever it encounters MyList type, even when it's nested.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't answer the question, to fire the model binder for Mylist i don't need to add the attribute. Does this make the Model Binder trigger when MyList is a property of MyListWrapper? – newbie Apr 28 '13 at 5:58

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