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I saw this earlier and it doesn't make any sense to me:

void generate(std::vector<float> v)
{
 float f = generate_next_float();
 v.push_back(f);
}

If v was sent as a reference or a pointer, that would make sense. But instead it is sent by value, and therefore copied into the function, right? So anything done to v is immediately useless once the function terminates this v is out of scope, deleted.

Am I right?

That is, the function generate_next_float() might do something, so not useless, but the use of the vector here seems pointless. f does not depend on it, and nothing is returned.

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1  
Depends on what side-effects generate_next_float() has. –  Mats Petersson Apr 5 '13 at 0:34
    
right, i edited the question and title to specify that I'm referring to the vector –  hellofunk Apr 5 '13 at 0:36
    
I would wonder where you saw this? It looks like buggy code; someone forgot to include the &. –  Parker Kemp Apr 5 '13 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, as far as the vector is concerned, the generate() function is pointless; the changes to v won't be visible to the caller.

I have a feeling that the author of generate() missed to pass by reference as a overlook, not as a plan :-)

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Well, considering std containers do not do implicit data sharing, that means you will pass a new deep copy into the function, push_back the float into that new copy that will then be discarded after the function is over. So, to me it would appear you are correct.

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In this function std::vector v will not change because you did not give the vector as a reference. It is just copied within the function and copy is changed but not the original one. You can use:

void generate(std::vector<float> &v) //input given as reference
{
  float f = generate_next_float();
  v.push_back(f);
}
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