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I installed Nginx in centOS 5.5 using YUM from Nginx repo.

After installation, it is initially in service stopped status. I want to start Nginx service now and configure it to be started at boot time. Before starting the service, I created a new ssl configuration in /etc/nginx/conf.d/ssl.conf

On the third line of this configuration file, I set server name as follow:

server_name   {{ www_name }};

I executed the following commands in terminal:

$ chkconfig nginx on
$ service nginx start

chkconfig command got executed successfully, but service start command gives me following error:

Starting nginx: nginx: [emerg] directive "server_name" is not terminated by ";" in /etc/nginx/conf.d/ssl.conf:3

This is how my ssl.conf looks like:

server {
listen 443 default_server;
server_name {{ www_name }};
underscores_in_headers on;
ssl on;
ssl_certificate cert.pem;
ssl_certificate_key cert.key;
...
}

This link explains the solution, but I can't understand. Surprisingly, someone else used this ssl.conf file before on another CentOS, somewhere else and I did not change anything!

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closed as off topic by Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp, Will Apr 8 '13 at 2:13

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

{{ www_name }} is not a valid entry. You need to use a domain name string or regex. The link you provided shows valid examples.

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You are right, it's completely invalid input. I fixed it. thanks –  Emad Van Ben Apr 8 '13 at 13:20

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