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I am trying to create genetic signatures. I have a textfile full of DNA sequences. I want to read in each line from the text file. Then add 4mers which are 4 bases into a dictionary. For example: Sample sequence

ATGATATATCTATCAT

What I want to add is ATGA, TGAT, GATA, etc.. into a dictionary with ID's that just increment by 1 while adding the 4mers.

So the dictionary will hold...

Genetic signatures, ID
ATGA,1
TGAT, 2
GATA,3

Here is what I have so far...

import sys  

def main ():
    readingFile = open("signatures.txt", "r")
    my_DNA=""

    DNAseq = {} #creates dictionary 

    for char in readingFile:
        my_DNA = my_DNA+char

    for char in my_DNA:             
        index = 0
        DnaID=1
        seq = my_DNA[index:index+4]         

        if (DNAseq.has_key(seq)): #checks if the key is in the dictionary
            index= index +1
        else :
            DNAseq[seq] = DnaID
            index = index+1
            DnaID= DnaID+1

    readingFile.close()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Here is my output:

ACTC
ACTC
ACTC
ACTC
ACTC
ACTC

This output suggests that it is not iterating through each character in string... please help!

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to move your index and DnaID declarations before the loop, otherwise they will be reset every loop iteration:

index = 0
DnaID=1
for char in my_DNA:             
    #... rest of loop here

Once you make that change you will have this output:

ATGA 1
TGAT 2
GATA 3
ATAT 4
TATA 5
ATAT 6
TATC 6
ATCT 7
TCTA 8
CTAT 9
TATC 10
ATCA 10
TCAT 11
CAT 12
AT 13
T 14

In order to avoid the last 3 items which are not the correct length you can modify your loop:

for i in range(len(my_DNA)-3):
    #... rest of loop here

This doesn't loop through the last 3 characters, making the output:

ATGA 1
TGAT 2
GATA 3
ATAT 4
TATA 5
ATAT 6
TATC 6
ATCT 7
TCTA 8
CTAT 9
TATC 10
ATCA 10
TCAT 11
share|improve this answer
    
Muchas gracias! Thanks a lot you rock! – brooklynchick Apr 5 '13 at 2:48

This should give you the desired effect.

from collections import defaultdict

readingFile = open("signatures.txt", "r").read()
DNAseq      = defaultdict(int)
window      = 4

for i in xrange(len(readingFile)):
    current_4mer = readingFile[i:i+window]
    if len(current_4mer) == window:
        DNAseq[current_4mer] += 1

print DNAseq
share|improve this answer

index is being reset to 0 each time through the loop that starts with for char in my_DNA:.

Also, I think the loop condition should be something like while index < len(my_DNA)-4: to be consistent with the loop body.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you a lot hun! – brooklynchick Apr 5 '13 at 2:50
    
@brooklynchick: Glad to help. I suggest you select the answer that has been most helpful and tick that answer to show you have accepted it. If you're unsure which one to tick, I'd suggest c4p's answer, because it seems to be the most complete to me. – Simon Apr 5 '13 at 3:18
    
Thank you Simon. How do I tick? This is the first time I have asked a question on stackoverflow. – brooklynchick Apr 5 '13 at 3:36
    
@brooklynchick: Under each answer there should be check box outline. Click on that to accept the answer that you prefer. See stackoverflow.com/faq under "How do I ask questions here?" for more information and a diagram that shows you how to do it. – Simon Apr 5 '13 at 3:40
    
Thank you I got it now :) Thank you for your kindness! – brooklynchick Apr 5 '13 at 3:43

Your index counters reset themselves since they are in the for loop.

May I make some further suggestions? My solution would look like that:

readingFile = open("signatures.txt", "r")
my_DNA=""

DNAseq = {} #creates dictionary 

for line in readingFile:    
    line = line.strip()
    my_DNA = my_DNA + line

ID = 1
index = 0
while True:

    try:
        seq = my_DNA[index:index+4]
        if not seq in my_DNA:
            DNAseq[ID] = my_DNA[index:index+4]
        index += 4
        ID += 1
    except IndexError:
        break

readingFile.close()

But what do you want to do with duplicates? E.g., if a sequence like ATGC appears twice? Should both be added under a different ID, for example {...1:'ATGC', ... 200:'ATGC',...} or shall those be omitted?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you guys I got it to work.. simple solution.. @ bluewood... I included an if else statement that checks the sequences(keys) in the dictionary and if it is already in it I do not add it to the dictionary. If it isnt in the dictionary then I add it – brooklynchick Apr 5 '13 at 2:47
    
Why would your while loop have true? wouldn't it be a condition? – brooklynchick Apr 5 '13 at 3:17
    
I think this is a good way to looping through something that has a variable length and when a while loop might seem more feasible than a for loop. In this case the loop would run until the last possible 4mer – user2015601 Apr 6 '13 at 3:08

If I'm understanding correctly, you are counting how often each sequential string of 4 bases occurs? Try this:

def split_to_4mers(filename):
    dna_dict = {}
    with open(filename, 'r') as f:
        # assuming the first line of the file, only, contains the dna string
        dna_string = f.readline();
        for idx in range(len(dna_string)-3):
            seq = dna_string[idx:idx+4]
            count = dna_dict.get(seq, 0)
            dna_dict[seq] = count+1
    return dna_dict

output on a file that contains only "ATGATATATCTATCAT":

{'TGAT': 1, 'ATCT': 1, 'ATGA': 1, 'TCAT': 1, 'TATA': 1, 'TATC': 2, 'CTAT': 1, 'ATCA': 1, 'ATAT': 2, 'GATA': 1, 'TCTA': 1}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you I will continue working on it :) – brooklynchick Apr 5 '13 at 2:48

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