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I'm trying to calculate text width using jQuery. I'm not sure what, but I am definitely doing something wrong.

So, here is the code:

var c = $('.calltoaction');

var cTxt = c.text();

var cWidth =  cTxt.outerWidth();

c.css('width' , cWidth);

Thank you for your help in advance!

share|improve this question
    
So, in what way is that code not working? What does it need to do differently? –  Sixten Otto Oct 17 '09 at 16:28

16 Answers 16

up vote 83 down vote accepted

This worked better for me:

$.fn.textWidth = function(){
  var html_org = $(this).html();
  var html_calc = '<span>' + html_org + '</span>';
  $(this).html(html_calc);
  var width = $(this).find('span:first').width();
  $(this).html(html_org);
  return width;
};
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 - this truly measures the text, not just the containing block element like brainreavis' solution. –  Ben Mar 23 '11 at 16:44
    
Slick. +1. It looks like you are missing a semi colon on the third line after '</span>', though it doesn't seem to make a difference (worked with or without it on FF9). –  shmeeps Jan 12 '12 at 18:33
8  
Be careful with this though... this method will unbind any events on child elements. –  brianreavis Feb 3 '12 at 21:05
    
Missing semicolon added :) –  Rune Kaagaard Feb 8 '12 at 9:11
    
I have tried to use this function in a number of ways, but it keeps returning null. Could someone please post the syntax for how this function is actually used? Do I run the .textWidth() function on a jQuery object? Do I pass text to this function? Do I run the function as a jQuery function (ie $.textWidth(jqObject)? Because none of those options seems to work. Thanks... –  moosefetcher Oct 31 '13 at 14:37

Here's a function that's better than others posted because

  1. it's shorter
  2. it works when passing an <input>, <span>, or "string".
  3. it's faster for frequent uses because it reuses an existing DOM element.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/philfreo/MqM76/

// Calculate width of text from DOM element or string. By Phil Freo <http://philfreo.com>
$.fn.textWidth = function(text, font) {
    if (!$.fn.textWidth.fakeEl) $.fn.textWidth.fakeEl = $('<span>').hide().appendTo(document.body);
    $.fn.textWidth.fakeEl.text(text || this.val() || this.text()).css('font', font || this.css('font'));
    return $.fn.textWidth.fakeEl.width();
};
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Brilliant stuff! –  Øyvind Bråthen Sep 19 '13 at 9:37
    
Wow! Pure awesomeness! –  Michel Triana Feb 19 at 22:34
1  
Great solution, should be accepted answer, I think! Thanks, pal! –  Ilia Rostovtsev May 8 at 18:32
    
Fantastico! Simple and clean. –  Carey Estes Jul 2 at 14:50

My solution

$.fn.textWidth = function(){
    var self = $(this),
        children = self.children(),
        calculator = $('<span style="display: inline-block;" />'),
        width;

    children.wrap(calculator);
    width = children.parent().width(); // parent = the calculator wrapper
    children.unwrap();
    return width;
};

Basically an improvement over Rune's, that doesn't use .html so lightly

share|improve this answer
    
By Ajarn Gerhard who posted this as an answer: This not working in IE8 because you're missing a / before the closing bracket of the <span> tag: calculator = $('<span style="display: inline-block;" />'), –  Petr R. Aug 17 '13 at 19:31
1  
This seems to return null if there is child element below the element you are measuring. Can it be made to work without the child element? See jsfiddle.net/h22tj/41 –  Casper Nov 9 '13 at 23:26
    
+1 - I never knew there was an unwrap(), that has caused me endless grief. –  Orwellophile Dec 19 '13 at 23:25
    
It always returns null on Chrome. –  Emerald214 Mar 12 at 9:49

jQuery's width functions can be a bit shady when trying to determine the text width due to inconsistent box models. The sure way would be to inject div inside your element to determine the actual text width:

$.fn.textWidth = function(){
  var sensor = $('<div />').css({margin: 0, padding: 0});
  $(this).append(sensor);
  var width = sensor.width();
  sensor.remove();
  return width;
};

To use this mini plugin, simply:

$('.calltoaction').textWidth();
share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't this give you the block width rather than the text? –  Josh Rickard Jun 12 '10 at 16:59
    
-1 This does indeed seem to measure the width of the box rather than the text width. –  Nathan Arthur Oct 31 '11 at 21:43
    
Wouldn't simply using a span instead of a div fix the width problem? If so, then this function is a bit better than the accepted answer. –  Josh Apr 18 '13 at 19:56

I found this solution works well and it inherits the origin font before sizing:

$.fn.textWidth = function(text){
  var org = $(this)
  var html = $('<span style="postion:absolute;width:auto;left:-9999px">' + (text || org.html()) + '</span>');
  if (!text) {
    html.css("font-family", org.css("font-family"));
    html.css("font-size", org.css("font-size"));
  }
  $('body').append(html);
  var width = html.width();
  html.remove();
  return width;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I ended up using this, but added org.css("font-weight"). Also, I would say that the if(!text) part is unintuitive. If I use e.g. jQuery("#someContainer").textWidth("Lorem ipsum") I would want to know the text width of "Lorem ipsum" when applied in that particular container. –  Sleavely Jun 20 '12 at 13:49

If your trying to do this with text in a select box or if those two arent working try this one instead:

$.fn.textWidth = function(){
 var calc = '<span style="display:none">' + $(this).text() + '</span>';
 $('body').append(calc);
 var width = $('body').find('span:last').width();
 $('body').find('span:last').remove();
 return width;
};

or

function textWidth(text){
 var calc = '<span style="display:none">' + text + '</span>';
 $('body').append(calc);
 var width = $('body').find('span:last').width();
 $('body').find('span:last').remove();
 return width;
};

if you want to grab the text first

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the thing, you are doing wrong, that you are calling a method on cTxt, which is a simple string and not a jQuery object. cTxt is really the contained text.

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Right. Thanks a lot! –  Dom Oct 17 '09 at 17:03

Neither Rune's nor Brain's was working for me in case when the element that was holding the text had fixed width. I did something similar to Okamera. It uses less selectors.

$.fn.textWidth = function(){
      var html_calc = $('<span>' + $(this).html() + '</span>');
      html_calc.css('font-size',$(this).css('font-size')).hide();
      html_calc.prependTo('body');
      var width = html_calc.width();
      html_calc.remove();
      return width;
    }
share|improve this answer
var calc = '<span style="display:none; margin:0 0 0 -999px">' + $('.move').text() + '</span>';
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The textWidth functions provided in the answers and that accept a string as an argument will not account for leading and trailing white spaces (those are not rendered in the dummy container). Also, they will not work if the text contains any html markup (a sub-string <br> won't produce any output and &nbsp; will return the length of one space).

This is only a problem for the textWidth functions which accept a string, because if a DOM element is given, and .html() is called upon the element, then there is probably no need to fix this for such use case.

But if, for example, you are calculating the width of the text to dynamically modify the width of an text input element as the user types (my current use case), you'll probably want to replace leading and trailing spaces with &nbsp; and encode the string to html.

I used philfreo's solution so here is a version of it that fixes this (with comments on additions):

$.fn.textWidth = function(text, font) {
    if (!$.fn.textWidth.fakeEl) $.fn.textWidth.fakeEl = $('<span>').appendTo(document.body);
    var htmlText = text || this.val() || this.text();
    htmlText = $.fn.textWidth.fakeEl.text(htmlText).html(); //encode to Html
    htmlText = htmlText.replace(/\s/g, "&nbsp;"); //replace trailing and leading spaces
    $.fn.textWidth.fakeEl.html(htmlText).css('font', font || this.css('font'));
    return $.fn.textWidth.fakeEl.width();
};
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Thanks. Your answer is most valuable. –  Vishal Aug 23 at 1:23

after chasing a ghost for two days, trying to figure out why the width of a text was incorrect, i realized it was because of white spaces in the text string that would stop the width calculation.

so, another tip is to check if the whitespaces are causing problems. use

&nbsp;

non-breaking space and see if that fixes it up.

the other functions people suggested work well too, but it was the whitespaces causing trouble.

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If you are trying to determine the width of a mix of text nodes and elements inside a given element, you need to wrap all the contents with wrapInner(), calculate the width, and then unwrap the contents.

*Note: You will also need to extend jQuery to add an unwrapInner() function since it is not provided by default.

$.fn.extend({
  unwrapInner: function(selector) {
      return this.each(function() {
          var t = this,
              c = $(t).children(selector);
          if (c.length === 1) {
              c.contents().appendTo(t);
              c.remove();
          }
      });
  },
  textWidth: function() {
    var self = $(this);
    $(this).wrapInner('<span id="text-width-calc"></span>');
    var width = $(this).find('#text-width-calc').width();
    $(this).unwrapInner();
    return width;
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for .wrapInner. As you probably know, dealing with pure text elements in jQuery is hell. If there are any other jQuery methods that are applicable, please let me know. I have had to resort to .get(0).children and it's not pretty. –  Orwellophile Dec 19 '13 at 23:28

Slight change to Nico's, since .children() will return an empty set if we're referencing a text element like an h1 or p. So we'll use .contents() instead, and use this instead of $(this) since we're creating a method on a jQuery object.

$.fn.textWidth = function(){
    var contents = this.contents(),
        wrapper  = '<span style="display: inline-block;" />',
        width    = '';

    contents.wrapAll(wrapper);
    width = contents.parent().width(); // parent is now the wrapper
    contents.unwrap();
    return width;
    };
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Call getColumnWidth() to get the with of the text. This works perfectly fine.

someFile.css
.columnClass { 
    font-family: Verdana;
    font-size: 11px;
    font-weight: normal;
}


function getColumnWidth(columnClass,text) { 
    tempSpan = $('<span id="tempColumnWidth" class="'+columnClass+'" style="display:none">' + text + '</span>')
          .appendTo($('body'));
    columnWidth = tempSpan.width();
    tempSpan.remove();
return columnWidth;
}

Note:- If you want inline .css pass the font-details in style only.

share|improve this answer

I modified Nico's code to work for my needs.

$.fn.textWidth = function(){
    var self = $(this),
        children = self.contents(),
        calculator = $('<span style="white-space:nowrap;" />'),
        width;

    children.wrap(calculator);
    width = children.parent().width(); // parent = the calculator wrapper
    children.unwrap();
    return width;
};

I'm using .contents() as .children() does not return text nodes which I needed. I also found that the returned width was impacted by the viewport width which was causing wrapping so I'm using white-space:nowrap; to get the correct width regardless of viewport width.

share|improve this answer

i think you should use $('.calltoaction').val;

also, i would be using id (#) instead of a class for that.. if u have more than one of such classes which how would it handle it?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, there is more then one in document. Why would you suggest id? –  Dom Oct 17 '09 at 16:35

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