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I have a List of Lists:

 A = [['andy', 'dear', 'boy', 'tobe', 'todo'], 
      ['where', 'what', 'when', 'how'], 
      ['korea', 'japan', 'china', 'usa'], 
      ['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']]

I have three questions to be exact:

  1. How do I retrieve a sub-list from this list using a particular element as a keyword?
    For instance, I want to retrieve all the lists having element 'why' in them? What is
    the best possible way of doing so?
  2. How do I retrieve a sub-list from this list using a part of a particular element as a keyword?
    For instance, I want to retrieve all the lists having elements containing 'wh' as beginning
    characters of any of the elements?
  3. How do I get the position or index of resulting sub-lists from any of these two searching methods?

I am familiar with the concept of retrieving all the elements from a list with matching with a particular keyword, but its confusing when it comes to retrieve all the lists matching a particular keyword...

Any guesses? Thanks in advance.

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8 Answers 8

Simple and straight

elem = 'why'
index_li = []
for idx, item in enumerate(A):
    for word in item:
        if word.startswith(elem):
            index_li.append(idx)
            break
print index_li

Example

>>> elem = 'wh'
... index_li = []
... for idx, item in enumerate(A):
...     for word in item:
...         if word.startswith(elem):
...             print word, item
...             index_li.append(idx)
...             break
... print index_li
where ['where', 'what', 'when', 'how']
where ['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']
[1, 3]
share|improve this answer

For all the answers combined:

mylist = [['andy', 'dear', 'boy', 'tobe', 'todo'], ['where', 'what', 'when', 'how'], ['korea', 'japan', 'china', 'usa'], ['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']]
for num, sublist in enumerate(mylist):
    if 'why' in sublist:
        print sublist
    for ele in sublist:
        if ele.startswith('wh'):
            print ele, num
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Haidro. This is really good. I had no idea that something like string.startswith() and string.endswith() already exists. Thanks a lot. :-) –  khan Apr 5 '13 at 5:21
    
@khan it's these functions that make me love the simplicity of python :D –  Haidro Apr 5 '13 at 5:23
    
@Haidro The best way to to get an index with python is using enumerate. Checking A.index(x) will have to search the list again for the item and thus won't work for duplicate lists –  jamylak Apr 5 '13 at 5:40
    
@jamylak Changed :). I'm so used to index() Lol :p –  Haidro Apr 5 '13 at 5:43
    
There isn't any problem with your code but your variable names are highly confusing –  jamylak Apr 5 '13 at 6:28

I love list comprehensions and functional programming, so here's that approach

A

sub_list_a = [ el for el in A if 'why' in el ]

B

sub_list_b = [ el for el in A if any( ['wh' in s for s in el] ) ]

A little more difficult to read, but concise and sensible.

C

Then to get the indices of where each of the sub_lists were found

location_a = [ ii for ii, el in enumerate(A) if el in sub_list_a ]

Simply replace b for a to get the locations for part b.

share|improve this answer
1  
More elegant and concise B: sub_list_b = [el for el in A if any('wh' in s for s in el)]. imo try not to use map if you have to use lambda with it –  jamylak Apr 5 '13 at 5:42
    
@jamylak Yeah, I like that better as well, thanks! Minor edit, though, that as written didn't work for me, see above. –  matty T pain Apr 5 '13 at 5:46
1  
also you should leave out the brackets inside the any so it will become a generator instead of a list comp. –  jamylak Apr 5 '13 at 6:27

For first:

>>> for l in A:
...     if 'why' in l:
...             print l
... 
['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']

For the second:(wy any where)

>>> for l in A:
...     for i in l:
...             if 'wh' in i:
...                     print l
...                     break
... 
['where', 'what', 'when', 'how']
['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']

to test at beginning try this: (using startswith() from @Harido)

>>> for l in A:
...     for i in l:
...             if i.startswith('wh'):
...                     print l
...                     break
... 
['where', 'what', 'when', 'how']
['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']

For third:

To find index, you can use A.index(l) method after print stamens for example:

>>> for l in A:
...     for i in l:
...             if 'wh' in i:
...                     print l
...                     print A.index(l)
...                     break
... 
['where', 'what', 'when', 'how']
1
['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']
3

But remember I am not good in Python. Some one can give you better ways. (I am writing C like code that is poor) I would like to share this link: Guido van Rossum

Edit:

thanks to @Jaime to suggesting me for k, l in enumerate(A):

>>> for k, l in enumerate(A):
...     for i in l:
...             if 'wh' in i:
...                     print l
...                     print "index =", k
...                     break
... 
['where', 'what', 'when', 'how']
index = 1
['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']
index = 3
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice shot, Grijesh! This is very good. I can only mark one question as a right answer, and yours may probably be the one. Let me wait for the next answers addressing 2 and 3 too (or maybe if you can add). –  khan Apr 5 '13 at 5:15
    
@khan ok done review. But I am not good in Python wait for someone like martijn-pieters for better answers –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 5 '13 at 5:27
1  
Instead of doing A.index(l), change the for loop to for k, l in enumerate(A): and kis the index of l without needing to look for it. –  Jaime Apr 5 '13 at 5:37
    
@Jaime Rahul has been given that answer. Thanks Jaime :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 5 '13 at 5:44
    
@khan Updated answer :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 5 '13 at 6:07

You'd do this the same way you'd do it for a single list, except you'll require an extra loop:

for inner_list in A:
    for element in inner_list:
        if # <some condition>
            # <do something>

For positions, adding an enumerate in the specific loop you want the position will help, or simply using something like find for each inner list will also do the job.

share|improve this answer
>>> A = [['andy', 'dear', 'boy', 'tobe', 'todo'], ['where', 'what', 'when', 'how'], ['korea', 'japan', 'china', 'usa'], ['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']]
>>> for i, sublist in enumerate(A):
        if 'why' in sublist:
            print i, sublist


3 ['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']
>>> for i, sublist in enumerate(A):
        if any(word.startswith('wh') for word in sublist):
            print i, sublist


1 ['where', 'what', 'when', 'how']
3 ['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']
share|improve this answer

a. suppose you have a list A and the word your are looking for is x.

def howmuch(word)
    lis = []
    for x in A:
        //point A
        if x.count(word) > 0:
        //point A
            lis.append(x)
    return lis

basically lis is a list that holds all the lists that has that word. you iterate through the original list. each element x is a list. x.count(word) tells you how many times that word is in this list. 0 means it never appeared in the list. so if it is greater than 0, it must be in the list. if so, we added to our lis variable. then we return it.

b. it is the same thing as problem a except at point A, after you get the list, do another for loop for each word in there. for python, there is a find function for strings to see if a substring exists in there if it does exists, then append it to the list element:

http://docs.python.org/2/library/string.html

c. for problem a, after you check to see that count is greater than 0, then that means the word exist in the list. do a list.index(word) and it will return the index. for problem b, once you find a string with the proper substring, do a list.index(word).

all in all, you should look at the python site, it tells you a lot of the functions you can use.

share|improve this answer
    
for each x in A: is invalid syntax :3. –  Haidro Apr 5 '13 at 5:38
    
thank you sorry about that, right it should be "for x in A:" i guess since it iterates the entire list, it kinda thought of it as a for each. i got it confused with something else. –  Jeff Apr 5 '13 at 5:44

You can use this simple approach:

>>> key='wh'
>>> res=[(index, sublist) for index, sublist in enumerate(A) for value in sublist if  value.startswith(key)]
>>> dict(res)
{1: ['where', 'what', 'when', 'how'], 3: ['tweet', 'where', 'why', 'how']}

enjoy!

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