Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

In C++, all I want to do is declare a DisplayInfo class in a .h file, and then in the .cpp file, not have to type the first DisplayInfo::DisplayInfo() and every function definition.

Sadly, I've looked at over 20 topics and my C++ book for over two hours now and have not been able to resolve this. I think it's because I'm trying to use my 10-year-old java training in C++.

1st trial:

//DisplayInfo.h  
namespace DisplayInfoNamespace 
{
  Class DisplayInfo 
  {
    public:
    DisplayInfo(); //default constructor
    float getWidth();
    float getHeight();
    ...
  };
}

//DisplayInfo.cpp
using namespace DisplayInfoNamespace;  //doesn't work
using namespace DisplayInfoNamespace::DisplayInfo //doesn't work either
using DisplayInfoNamespace::DisplayInfo //doesn't work
{
  DisplayInfo::DisplayInfo() {}; //works when I remove the namespace, but the first DisplayInfo:: is what I don't want to type 
  DisplayInfo::getWidth() {return DisplayInfo::width;}  //more DisplayInfo:: that I don't want to type
  ...
}

For the second trial, I tried switching the order, so it was

class DisplayInfo
{

  namespace DisplayInfoNamespace
  {
  ...
  }
}

And in the .cpp file, tried all of the above plus

using namespace DisplayInfo::DisplayInfoNamespace; 

For the third trial I tried forward declaring it with this header:

namespace DisplayInfoNamespace
{
  class DisplayInfo;
}
class DisplayInfo
{
public:
...all my methods and constructors...
};

I'm using VisualStudio2010 express and despite carefully reading the error messages have not been able to find the right arrangement of classes and namespaces in the header and .cpp file to make this work out.

And now after I spent 30 minutes typing this, is C++: "Class namespaces"? the answer? (aka no, you have to use typedefs?)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Tushar, Nicol Bolas, Gorpik, Matthieu M., Bo Persson Apr 5 '13 at 7:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer 1

There is no way to shorten the A::A() definition syntax, when you do it outside of the class.

within the class it would alow you to define the functions inplace without havinf to select the correct scope.

example:

// in *.h
namespace meh {
  class A {
  public:
    A() {
      std::cout << "A construct" << std::endl;
    }

    void foo();
    void bar();
  }

  void foo();
}

void foo();


// in *.cpp

void foo() {
  std::cout << "foo from outside the namespace" << std::endl;
}

void meh::foo() {
  std::cout << "foo from inside the namespace, but not inside the class" << std::endl;
}

void meh::A::foo() {
  std::cout << "foo" << std::endl;
}


namespace meh {
  void A::bar() {
    std::cout << "bar" << std::endl;
  }
}

As you can see, namespaces would rather add another thing to put in front of your method name, rather than remove one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but that seems so odd that there's no way to bypass that. Am I meant to define the class in the .cpp file or something? –  user2247872 Apr 5 '13 at 7:49
    
no, but if you do not, you have to specify where foo() comes from (in the example). i'll edit to clear that up. –  scones Apr 5 '13 at 7:51

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.