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I have a table with 3 columns:

  • field1 is a Category
  • field2 and field3 hold Measures (integers 1,2,3,4 and 5 to be exact).

Using Javascript, how can I conditionally format the background color of the cells in the table that hold these measures (notably field2 and field3) to correspond with the following colors:

  • cells with 1 are RED
  • cells with 2,3, and 4 are BLUE
  • cells with 5 are GREEN

Here's what I have so far (it's all in one HTML file for now, just while I get it sorted out) and I've broken it up for readability. I think I might be missing the background attribute in the HTML altogether. I know its possible, but not sure how to dynamically change the background color of a table cell depending on its contents using Javascript.

Thanks in advance.

Start of the script

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.4/jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">

$(document).ready(function(){
    $( "#status_report td.measure:contains('1')" ).css('background-color', '#fcc' );
});
</script>
<style type="text/css">
</style>
</head>
<body>
<table id="status_report">
<tr>
    <th>field1</th>
    <th>field2</th>
    <th>field3</th>
</tr>
<tr>
    <td class = "measure">Example</td>
    <td class = "measure">1</td>
    <td class = "measure">2</td>    
</tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>

Update:

A comment pointed out a syntax error (extra semi-colon) which was removed and the above code works fine. However, there was an even better answer posted and has been accepted.

share|improve this question
    
Your <td> tags don't have .measure class, hence jQuery selector can't find the corresponding elements. – VisioN Apr 5 '13 at 7:55
    
@VisioN sorry, I had those in my code, just forgot to include them here. I've updated the code to include the measure class, but I think the javascript is not correct. :/ – Ben Apr 5 '13 at 7:56
    
jQuery works client-side; therefore the PHP is irrelevant to the question; can you show the HTML as received by the browser? – David Thomas Apr 5 '13 at 7:57
    
@BenJones Also you have a syntax error: semicolon ; right before closing ) paren in JavaScript. – VisioN Apr 5 '13 at 7:58
    
@DavidThomas yes, appreciate the explanation along w. ur request too, because it helps me understand why and learn. I'll make the update. Please shed some light if you have any ideas. :) Cheers – Ben Apr 5 '13 at 8:03
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could do it even with PHP. Why? Because JS is executed on client-side and if it is turned off, users will not see the colored cells.

<?php 
$colors = array(
  1 => "red",
  2 => "blue",
  3 => "blue",
  4 => "blue"
  5 => "green"
) ;

foreach( $data as $row ) : ?>
<tr>
  <?php foreach($row as $num): ?>
    <td style="background-color: <?php echo (isset($colors[(int)$num]) ? $colors[(int)$num] : "white") ; ?>"><?php echo $num ; ?></td>
  <?php endforeach ; ?>
</tr>   
<? endforeach; ?>

You could use classes in td tags as well instead of straight style.

If you still need a solution with JQuery, I can edit my answer.

share|improve this answer
    
good point!! So then, would you say for this reason, it is generally always better to do this sort of thing in PHP? Thanks – Ben Apr 25 '13 at 8:58

While you've accepted an answer, a JavaScript implementation is certainly possible, here using plain JavaScript rather than jQuery:

function formatCells(table){
    var tbody = table.getElementsByTagName('tbody')[0],
        cells = tbody.getElementsByTagName('td'),
        colors = ['red', 'blue', 'green'];
    for (var c = 0, len = cells.length; c < len; c++){
        if (cells[c].cellIndex > 0){
            switch (parseInt((cells[c].textContent || cells[c].innerText), 10)){
                case 1:
                    cells[c].style.backgroundColor = colors[0];
                    break;
                case 2:
                case 3:
                case 4:
                    cells[c].style.backgroundColor = colors[1];
                    break;
                case 5:
                    cells[c].style.backgroundColor = colors[2];
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}

formatCells(document.getElementsByTagName('table')[0]);

JS Fiddle demo.

Given your recently-added HTML, you could apply the above to your own table as follows:

formatCells(document.getElementById('status_report'));

JS Fiddle demo.

Edited to offer a sane (and scalable) jQuery solution, rather than having a separate line of jQuery for every possible alternative:

var colorMap = {
    1 : 'red',
    2 : 'blue',
    3 : 'blue',
    4 : 'blue',
    5 : 'green',
};

$('#status_report td').css('background-color', function(){
    return colorMap[$(this).text()] || '';
});

JS Fiddle demo.

And, just because I like plain JavaScript, I thought I'd offer a demonstration of how to achieve the same end-result by extending the Object.prototype:

Object.prototype.propByTextValue = function(prop, obj){
    if (!obj){
        return this;
    }
    else {
        var that = this.length ? this : [this],
            txt = '';
        for (var i = 0, len = that.length; i < len; i++){
            that[i].style[prop] = obj[parseInt((that[i].textContent || that[i].innerText), 10)];
        }
    }
    return this;
};

var colorMap = {
    1 : 'red',
    2 : 'blue',
    3 : 'blue',
    4 : 'blue',
    5 : 'green',
};

document
.getElementById('status_report')
.getElementsByTagName('td')
.propByTextValue('background-color', colorMap);

JS Fiddle demo.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't even realize until I looked at the code, that their answer was all in PHP. I was looking for a Javascript solution, which you have provided, so, while both valid ways to achieve objective, I will accept your answer because it answers how to do it in Javascript (what I was after). thanks! – Ben Apr 5 '13 at 8:11
    
beauty! hats off mate, nicely done with the JS Fiddle demo. Cheers – Ben Apr 5 '13 at 8:13
    
I was just waiting when you come up with pure JavaScript code :) – VisioN Apr 5 '13 at 8:53
    
@VisioN: I like plain-JavaScript where possible (and I had to fight with myself to not start extending prototypes)... :D – David Thomas Apr 5 '13 at 8:55
1  
So am I. However browser incompatibility sometimes stops me from writing pure JS. Hopefully now even junk starts to support most features of this clumsy but wonderful language. Coding heaven is so close :) – VisioN Apr 5 '13 at 9:10

Add data attributes to your cells:

<table id="status_report">
<tr>
    <th>fee_source_id</th>
    <th>field1</th>
    <th>field2</th>
    <th>field3</th>
</tr>

<?php foreach( $data as $row ) : ?>
<tr>
    <td data-bg="<?php echo $row['field1']; ?>"><?php echo $row['field1']; ?></td>
    <td data-bg="<?php echo $row['field2']; ?>"><?php echo $row['field2']; ?></td>
    <td data-bg="<?php echo $row['field3']; ?>"><?php echo $row['field3']; ?></td>  
</tr>

<? endforeach;
$dbh = null; ?>
</table>

And the js :

$(document).ready(function(){
    $( "#status_report .measure[data-bg='1']").css('background', 'red');
    $( "#status_report .measure[data-bg='2']").css('background', 'blue');
    $( "#status_report .measure[data-bg='3']").css('background', 'blue');
    $( "#status_report .measure[data-bg='4']").css('background', 'blue');
    $( "#status_report .measure[data-bg='5']").css('background', 'green');
});

Demo : http://jsfiddle.net/pUw6u/

share|improve this answer
    
this seems to be the cleanest answer yet and probably the best way to do it. Answer has been accepted. JS Fiddle to boot! SO community never ceases to amaze me. Thanks! – Ben Apr 5 '13 at 8:19
    
The data attribute allow you to add the extention what you want. So "bg" is for "background", but you can use "data-id", "data-foo", "data-bar", ... – Xanatos Apr 5 '13 at 8:24
    
yes, figured "bg" was for background, and know that you can use whatever name you want there, that's great. thanks. – Ben Apr 5 '13 at 9:09

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