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I want to disable the two finger swipe that causes Chrome going back or forward. I have a website where the user might lose progress on his work if he doesn't specifically saves.

I have tried using window.onbeforeunload but that doesn't seem to work if I have hashes in the url (back forward would change between www.example.com/work/#step1#unsaved www.example.com/work/#step0) and the event doesn't seem to trigger.

I was about to switch to another solution but today I noticed that in Google Docs it's completely disabled. How did they achieve that?

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window.onbeforeunload require synchronous tasks. Maybe that was the problem with that approach. –  jan salawa Apr 8 '13 at 9:08
    
Can you use the onhashchange event to detect when a swipe tries to change the hasn? –  Barmar Apr 14 '13 at 3:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're looking at the problem at the wrong level. OnBeforeUnload is simply not triggered because there is nothing being unloaded from the browsers perspective. Therefore you have, quite bluntly, implemented the wrong mechanism for versioning - fragments are for page states, not document states as you are using it now.

If you insist on maintaining state through hash fragments you need to use another mechanism to guard against page state changing. Since all current browsers support LocalStorage I'd use that. And well, while at it, put all the document state data there instead of in the URL, since that is how Google Docs does it and that is why they don't have this issue.

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I already discovered that onbeforeunload doesn't work "I have tried using window.onbeforeunload but that doesn't seem to work " –  andrei Apr 13 '13 at 9:08

Make the specific page open in a new tab/window by default (by putting target="_blank"> in hyperlink). That way there'll be no previous page to go back to.

Or prevent Horizontal Scrolling by default. To do that, you can use jquery.mousewheel to do:

$(document).on("mousewheel",function(event,delta){ 
  // prevent horizontal scrolling
  if (event.originalEvent.wheelDeltaX !== 0) {
    event.preventDefault();
  } 
});
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Building on both the previous answers given by @roy riojas and @redgetan - I combined their answers to allow for this to be dynamic and prevent both forward and backwards - again - per @roy's comments - you must know the class of your element, and for this implementation - the class of the nested element that is actually being scrolled

(function ($) {
  $(document).on('mousewheel', function(e) { 
    var $target = $(e.target).closest('.scrollable-h');
    var scroll = $target.scrollLeft();
    var maxScroll = $target.find('.scrollable-h-content').width() - $target.width();

    if(scroll <= 0) {
      if(scroll <= 0 && e.originalEvent.wheelDeltaX >= 0) {
        e.preventDefault();
      }
    }
    if(scroll >= maxScroll) {
      if (scroll >1 && e.originalEvent.wheelDeltaX <= 0) {
        e.preventDefault();
      }
    }
});}(jQuery));
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Hi this worked for me on chrome but not for the entire page, but for places where I have scrollable content.

In Google Docs (Spreadsheets) it seems to be working because they don't have a back page to go. If you navigate to another URL (manually) it will not prevent you from navigating back.

$(document).on('mousewheel', function(e) { 
  var $target = $(e.target).closest('.scrollable-h');
  if ($target.scrollLeft () <= 4) {
    $target.scrollLeft(5);
    return false;
  }
});

One thing to keep in mind is that the code above is making two assumptions:

  1. your element with horizontal scrollable content has a class scrollable-h
  2. If checks if the scrollLeft if bigger less than 4px and then just make it scroll to 5px returning false effectively cancel the back gesture

Important: - This only prevents the back swipe gesture, when is done fast, if you do it very slow it will still trigger sometimes.

  • Also this does not prevent the forward swipe gesture, but it could also be done by checking if the element has reached the maximum scrollLeft. If that is the case then move it 20px back and return false to prevent the event from happening... It is up to you to add this use case if it happens to make sense to you.

You can take a look to a proof of concept here. http://jsfiddle.net/royriojas/JVA6m/#base

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I was able to disable it by typing chrome://flags in the address bar and heading down to "Overscroll history navigation" and setting it to "Disabled" from the dropdown.

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