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I have the following class:

public class Class1
{
    private int pam1;

    public Class1()
    {

    }

    public void ChangePam1(int _NewValue)
    {
        UpdatePam1(_NewValue);
        pam1 = _NewValue;
    }

    public int Pam1
    {
        set { this.pam1 = value; }
        get { return this.pam1; }
    }
}

Currently, when I want to change the value of Pam1, I do the following:

int n = 500;
Class1 c1 = new Class1();
c1.ChangePam1(n);

How can I change it using Set?

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closed as not a real question by burning_LEGION, Soner Gönül, bAN, Cyril Gandon, Stony Apr 5 '13 at 9:53

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you asking how to set a property?, c1.Pam1 = 500 –  Jodrell Apr 5 '13 at 8:44
    
Not only setting a property, but also doing stuff related to the change, in this case, updating the value in the database. –  enb081 Apr 5 '13 at 8:51
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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can do this (It will call the set):

public class Class1
{
    private int pam1;

    public Class1(){}

    private void ChancePam1(int newValue)
    {
        UpdatePam1(newValue);
        pam1 = newValue;
    }

    public int Pam1
    {
        set { ChancePam1(value); }
        get { return this.pam1; }
    }
}

Then:

int n = 500;
Class1 c1 = new Class1();
c1.Pam1 = n;

Also have look at this.

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That won't update the value in db! –  enb081 Apr 5 '13 at 8:38
3  
Setting a property should typically not have such a drastic side effect (updating the DB). If you want that behavior, a method is more appropriate (see Use properties where appropriate) –  Tim Medora Apr 5 '13 at 8:40
    
@enb081 Because this code doesn't do relevant about database updates. –  Soner Gönül Apr 5 '13 at 8:40
2  
It's better to make ChanceParam1 private in order to keep encapsulation. –  Javid Apr 5 '13 at 8:44
    
If a method is more appropriate, then I should leave it the way it is? But all my objects correspond to DataBase tables, and It is easier to write c1.Pam1 = n than c1.ChangePam1(n); –  enb081 Apr 5 '13 at 8:45
show 1 more comment

Just set your c1 object's Pam1 property.

c1.Pam1 = n;

Or you can use;

public int Pam1
{
    set { ChancePam1(value); }
    get { return this.pam1; }
}
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If you want it to do something else, define it in your code

public int Pam1
{
    set { 
         this.pam1 = value; 
         UpdatePam1(value);
         }
    get { return this.pam1; }
}

You can work in a setter almost like in a normal method.

When in doubt, consider MSDN on the topic.

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Changing your class in following way might be a good idea:

public class Class1
{
    private int pam1;

    public Class1()
    {

    }

    public int Pam1
    {
        set { UpdatePam1(_NewValue);this.pam1 = value; }
        get { return this.pam1; }
    }
}

... and to work with your property:

int n = 500;
Class1 c1 = new Class1();
c1.pam1=n;
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you just have to call the UpdatePam1(value) in your set

public int Pam1
{
    set { UpdatePam1(value);
          pam1 = value; 
        }
    get { return this.pam1; }
}

or

 public int Pam1
{
    set { ChangePam1(value); }
    get { return this.pam1; }
}
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