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In my project there is one lengthy dynamic query which is as below-

basic_query varchar2(1000);
final_query varchar2(1500);
where_clause varchar2(500) default null;

basic_query :=<select ...from table where ....>

If(<condition1>)
    then 
    where_clause := <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause1>
elsif(<condition2>)
    then 
    where_clause := <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause2>
elsif(<condition3>)
    then 
    where_clause := <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause3>
else  
    where_clause := <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause4>
endif;



final_query :=basic_query || where_clause || '<group_by_clause'> || <'order_by_clause'>;

execute immediate final_query;

Now my client wants to convert this dynamic query to static one. I have tried it with using CASE,but it's not working properly.

select ...from table where condition1,and 
case(
when(<condition1> and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause1>)
    then 'valid'
when(<condition2> and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause2>
    then 'valid'
when(<condition1> and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause3>)
    then 'valid'
when(<condition2> and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause4>
        then 'valid'
    else 'invalid'
end;)='valid

It is checking the conditions given in CASE clause & if any one of is true,it gives output without adding these conditions in where clause.

Hope someone will understand this problem & will give the solution. Thanks In advance.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Mark Bannister, DazzaL, rgettman, Iswanto San, Jean Apr 6 '13 at 0:24

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Your "new" query also appears to be dynamic - <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause1>. At present this question is so vague that I have no idea what is being asked. – Mark Bannister Apr 5 '13 at 10:09
2  
Also, "Now my client wants to convert this dynamic query to static one" - why is your client telling you how to write your code? – Mark Bannister Apr 5 '13 at 10:11
1  
In principle what you're doing with case will work, so I think some detail has been lost in your simplification for posting. I suspect the equivalent of the final else in the original is too lax, as it would have to negate all the previous conditions (but it's unclear if you're doing that since you've repeated conditions 1 and 2, which doesn't look right at all). Also can't tell if dynamic SQL is appropriate here - depends what the actual conditions are. If it is then I'd also query why your client disagrees. The reason to switch might inform an alternative approach. – Alex Poole Apr 5 '13 at 10:12
    
This problem is called "Dynamic where clause". Go to asktom a there you will find several articles about it. – ibre5041 Apr 5 '13 at 10:33
2  
Tell your client that as long as the code produces valid results and executes in a reasonable amount of time it's none of their business how it's done. (We once had a client demand to see the source code for a product to make sure it was "really written in C++". When we asked why (preparatory to blowing them off) the response was "All software in our organization must be written in C++". When asked what language MS-DOS (it was that long ago :-) was written in they gave us a look of abject horror. I don't know if Microsoft ever answered their question. I know we never did :-). – Bob Jarvis Apr 5 '13 at 11:22

As I said in a comment, in principle using case as you have shown should work (where by 'work' I mean produce the same result; which doesn't necessarily mean it's any better and could have performance and maintenance implications etc.). To demonstrate I'll create some dummy data:

create table t42 (flag varchar2(1), value varchar2(10), cond number);
insert into t42 values ('Y', 'One', 1);
insert into t42 values ('Y', 'Two', 2);
insert into t42 values ('Y', 'Three', 3);

... and two procedures in a package:

create package p42 as
procedure proc1(parm number);
procedure proc2(parm number);
end p42;
/

create package body p42 as

procedure proc1(parm number) is
    basic_query varchar2(1000);
    final_query varchar2(1500);
    where_clause varchar2(500) default null;
    result t42.value%type;
begin
    basic_query := 'select value from t42 where flag = ''Y'' ';

    if parm = 2013 then
        where_clause := 'and cond = 1 ';
    elsif parm = 2012 then
        where_clause := 'and cond = 2 ';
    else
        where_clause := 'and cond = 3 ';
    end if;

    final_query := basic_query || where_clause;
    execute immediate final_query into result;
    dbms_output.put_line(result);
end proc1;

procedure proc2(parm number) is
    result t42.value%type;
begin
    select value into result from t42 where flag = 'Y'
    and case
        when parm = 2013 and cond = 1 then 'valid'
        when parm = 2012 and cond = 2 then 'valid'
        when not (parm = 2013 or parm = 2012) and cond = 3 then 'valid'
        else 'invalid' end = 'valid';
    dbms_output.put_line(result);
end proc2;

end p42;
/

So proc1 is essentially doing what your original dynamic query does, I believe. proc2 is using your case construct. Clearly the conditions are completely made up and the variable where clause would be stupid in this form, but this is only about the case.

Running with various values for parm (2013, 2012, 2011) gives the same row back through both procedures, so they're equivalent in that sense

exec p42.proc1(2013);

One

exec p42.proc2(2013);

One

I suspect you've got the final condition wrong. Of course I'm guessing, since the pseudocode you've posted is so far removed form your actual query that we can't see what you might have done wrong. But if you did something like this:

    and case
        when parm = 2013 and cond = 1 then 'valid'
        when parm = 2012 and cond = 2 then 'valid'
        when cond = 3 then 'valid'
        else 'invalid' end = 'valid';

... then cond = 3 would be evaluated for all the rows that hadn't already matched on an earlier case, regardless of the value of parm - e.g. if parm = 2013 and cond = 3, which your original dynamic version would not have picked up. With 2013 you'd match One and Three. So you'd need to exclude all the parm values that you'd used as conditions earlier, and only then look at cond = 3:

    and case
        when parm = 2013 and cond = 1 then 'valid'
        when parm = 2012 and cond = 2 then 'valid'
        when not (parm = 2013 or parm = 2012) and cond = 3 then 'valid'
        else 'invalid' end = 'valid';

So in your pseudocode, that might mean:

select ... from table where condition1 and  case
    when (<condition1> and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause1>)
        then 'valid'
    when (<condition2> and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause2>
        then 'valid'
    when (<condition3> and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause3>)
        then 'valid'
    when (not (<condition1> or <condition2> or <condition3>)
        and <one_new_condition_will_be_added_in_where_clause4>)
        then 'valid'
    else 'invalid'
end = 'valid'

I'm not necessarily saying this is a good idea, just that it ought to work. Without knowing why your client objects to dynamic SQL (all of it? some specific aspect of your query? some impact you're having on the database, e.g. through not using bind variables?) and what your real query is doing it's impossible to know if this approach is appropriate. There may be a much better way, and that might be improving the dynamic version for all we know...

share|improve this answer

I would recommend you to use PL/SQL function in the code.

select ...from table where 'Y' = IsRecordValid(...all relevant values in conditions...);

And implement the evaluation there. I am not sure about your considaration about performance, but you maybe interested in function based index to improve your performance.

Other approach is to use dbms_sql package which you can use to create dynamically SQL but keep almost all benefits of static query.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for reply.Is there any solution by using CASE? – Bit_hunter Apr 5 '13 at 11:36

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