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Hello I am looking for an efficient way of selecting POSIXct rows from a data.table such that the time of day is less than say 12:00:00 (NOTE that millisecond is NOT required, so we can use ITime for example)

set.seed(1); N = 1e7;
DT = data.table(dts = .POSIXct(1e5*rnorm(N), tz="GMT"))
DT
                               dts
#       1: 1969-12-31 06:35:54.618925
#       2: 1970-01-01 05:06:04.332422
#     ---                           
# 9999999: 1970-01-03 00:37:00.035565
#10000000: 1969-12-30 08:30:23.624506

One solution (the problem here is that the cast could be costly if N is big)

f <- function(t, st, et) {time <- as.ITime(t); return(time>=as.ITime(st) & time<=as.ITime(et))}
P <- function(t, s) { #geekTrader solution
    ep <- .parseISO8601(s) 
    if(grepl('T[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}/T[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}', s)){
        first.time <- as.double(ep$first.time)
        last.time <- as.double(ep$last.time)-31449600
        SecOfDay <- as.double(t) %% 86400
        return(SecOfDay >= first.time & SecOfDay <= last.time )
    } else {
        return(t >= ep$first.time & t <= ep$last.time)    
    }
}

Quick look about the perf

system.time(resf <- DT[f(dts,'00:00:00','11:59:59')])
   user  system elapsed 
   1.01    0.28    1.29
system.time(resP <- DT[P(dts,'T00:00:00/T11:59:59')])
   user  system elapsed 
   0.64    0.13    0.76 

identical(resf,resP)
[1] TRUE
share|improve this question
    
Are you happy enough to create an itime column and key by it? –  mnel Apr 8 '13 at 23:14
    
@mnel: yes so we do a binary search... –  statquant Apr 9 '13 at 10:04
2  
You really shouldn't edit people's answers into your question –  GSee Apr 9 '13 at 13:50
1  
I see... why is that ? looks better for understanding to me... –  statquant Apr 9 '13 at 13:58
    
@statquant : just curious why was bounty awarded to the Richie's answer? –  Chinmay Patil Apr 16 '13 at 1:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
 P <- function(t, s) {
  ep <- .parseISO8601(s)

  if(grepl('T[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}/T[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}', s)){
    first.time <- as.double(ep$first.time)
    last.time <- as.double(ep$last.time)-31449600
    SecOfDay <- as.double(t) %% 86400
    return(SecOfDay >= first.time & SecOfDay <= last.time )

  } else {
    return(t >= ep$first.time & t <= ep$last.time)    
  }

}

F <- function(t, st, et) {
  time <- as.ITime(t) 
  return(time>=as.ITime(st) & time<=as.ITime(et))
}


 Sys.setenv(TZ='GMT')
 N = 1e7;
 set.seed(1);

 DT <- data.table(dts = .POSIXct(1e5*rnorm(N), tz="GMT"))


 system.time(resP <- DT[P(dts, 'T00:00:00/T12:00:00'), ])
##   user  system elapsed 
##   1.11    0.11    1.22 
 system.time(resF <- DT[F(dts,'00:00:00','12:00:00')])
##   user  system elapsed 
##   2.22    0.29    2.51 

 resP
##                         dts
##      1: 1969-12-31 06:35:54
##      2: 1970-01-01 05:06:04
##      3: 1969-12-31 00:47:17
##      4: 1970-01-01 09:09:10
##      5: 1969-12-31 01:12:33
##     ---                    
##5000672: 1970-01-01 06:08:15
##5000673: 1970-01-01 05:02:27
##5000674: 1969-12-31 02:25:24
##5000675: 1970-01-03 00:37:00
##5000676: 1969-12-30 08:30:23
 resF
##                         dts
##      1: 1969-12-31 06:35:54
##      2: 1970-01-01 05:06:04
##      3: 1969-12-31 00:47:17
##      4: 1970-01-01 09:09:10
##      5: 1969-12-31 01:12:33
##     ---                    
##5000672: 1970-01-01 06:08:15
##5000673: 1970-01-01 05:02:27
##5000674: 1969-12-31 02:25:24
##5000675: 1970-01-03 00:37:00
##5000676: 1969-12-30 08:30:23

 #Check the correctness
 resP[,list(mindts=max(dts)),by=list(as.Date(dts))]
##       as.Date              mindts
## 1: 1969-12-31 1969-12-31 12:00:00
## 2: 1970-01-01 1970-01-01 12:00:00
## 3: 1969-12-29 1969-12-29 12:00:00
## 4: 1970-01-02 1970-01-02 12:00:00
## 5: 1969-12-30 1969-12-30 12:00:00
## 6: 1970-01-03 1970-01-03 12:00:00
## 7: 1970-01-04 1970-01-04 11:59:59
## 8: 1970-01-05 1970-01-05 11:59:45
## 9: 1969-12-28 1969-12-28 12:00:00
##10: 1969-12-27 1969-12-27 11:59:21
##11: 1970-01-06 1970-01-06 10:53:21
##12: 1969-12-26 1969-12-26 10:15:03
##13: 1970-01-07 1970-01-07 08:21:55
 resF[,list(mindts=max(dts)),by=list(as.Date(dts))]
##       as.Date              mindts
## 1: 1969-12-31 1969-12-31 12:00:00
## 2: 1970-01-01 1970-01-01 12:00:00
## 3: 1969-12-29 1969-12-29 12:00:00
## 4: 1970-01-02 1970-01-02 12:00:00
## 5: 1969-12-30 1969-12-30 12:00:00
## 6: 1970-01-03 1970-01-03 12:00:00
## 7: 1970-01-04 1970-01-04 11:59:59
## 8: 1970-01-05 1970-01-05 11:59:45
## 9: 1969-12-28 1969-12-28 12:00:00
##10: 1969-12-27 1969-12-27 11:59:21
##11: 1970-01-06 1970-01-06 10:53:21
##12: 1969-12-26 1969-12-26 10:15:03
##13: 1970-01-07 1970-01-07 08:21:55

Now some demo of nice xts style subsetting

 DT[P(dts, '1970')]
##                         dts
##      1: 1970-01-01 05:06:04
##      2: 1970-01-02 20:18:48
##      3: 1970-01-01 09:09:10
##      4: 1970-01-01 13:32:22
##      5: 1970-01-01 20:30:32
##     ---                    
##5001741: 1970-01-02 15:51:12
##5001742: 1970-01-03 01:41:31
##5001743: 1970-01-01 06:08:15
##5001744: 1970-01-01 05:02:27
##5001745: 1970-01-03 00:37:00
 DT[P(dts, '197001')]
##                         dts
##      1: 1970-01-01 05:06:04
##      2: 1970-01-02 20:18:48
##      3: 1970-01-01 09:09:10
##      4: 1970-01-01 13:32:22
##      5: 1970-01-01 20:30:32
##     ---                    
##5001741: 1970-01-02 15:51:12
##5001742: 1970-01-03 01:41:31
##5001743: 1970-01-01 06:08:15
##5001744: 1970-01-01 05:02:27
##5001745: 1970-01-03 00:37:00
 DT[P(dts, '19700102')]
##                         dts
##      1: 1970-01-02 20:18:48
##      2: 1970-01-02 17:59:38
##      3: 1970-01-02 07:14:53
##      4: 1970-01-02 02:13:03
##      5: 1970-01-02 01:31:37
##     ---                    
##1519426: 1970-01-02 11:25:24
##1519427: 1970-01-02 10:00:21
##1519428: 1970-01-02 05:21:25
##1519429: 1970-01-02 05:11:26
##1519430: 1970-01-02 15:51:12
 DT[P(dts, '19700102 00:00:00/19700103 12:00:00')]
##                         dts
##      1: 1970-01-02 20:18:48
##      2: 1970-01-02 17:59:38
##      3: 1970-01-02 07:14:53
##      4: 1970-01-02 02:13:03
##      5: 1970-01-02 01:31:37
##     ---                    
##1785762: 1970-01-02 05:21:25
##1785763: 1970-01-02 05:11:26
##1785764: 1970-01-02 15:51:12
##1785765: 1970-01-03 01:41:31
##1785766: 1970-01-03 00:37:00

 #Check the correctness again
 DT[P(dts, '19700102 00:00:00/19700103 12:00:00'), max(dts)]
##[1] "1970-01-03 12:00:00 GMT"
 DT[P(dts, '19700102 00:00:00/19700103 12:00:00'), min(dts)]
##[1] "1970-01-02 00:00:00 GMT"
share|improve this answer
    
Rightly or wrongly, I tend to use HHMMSS stored as plain integer; i.e. no epoch, no class. –  Matt Dowle Apr 7 '13 at 10:08
    
Nice. Storing time as seconds and %% 86400 seems like a nice straightforward solution, and mostly likely pretty fast. –  Aaron Apr 9 '13 at 4:45
    
@statquant Seem to be working ok after we replace as.integer by as.double –  Chinmay Patil Apr 9 '13 at 11:26
    
Well done, identical. But would that work on a leap year ? cause there is more than 86400 seconds those years... –  statquant Apr 9 '13 at 13:54
    
It will work on leap year too. POSIXct ignores leap seconds. Read that somewhere in documentation –  Chinmay Patil Apr 9 '13 at 14:10

The canonical way of doing this is to convert to POSIXlt and extract the hour component.

hour(as.POSIXlt(DT$dts, "GMT")) < 12

This seems to be comparable in performance to the other techniques discussed (and is easier to understand).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Surely this is just about the fastest way? If not, it is certainly the most comprehensible to me. It reduced 1e7 rows to ~ 5e6 rows (what I would expect given rnorm) in ~ 1 second. And requires no more than base R. –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 11 '13 at 12:51
    
data.table::hour is already using as.POSIXlt, so you can write something like DT[, morning:= (hour(DT$dts) < 12)]. –  Oscar Perpiñán Apr 12 '13 at 14:07
    
Have you guys tried benchmarking? My initial benchmarking revealed as.POSIXlt didn't really give as much performance boost.. –  Chinmay Patil Apr 12 '13 at 16:12

Here's a way that uses some of the functionality from xts to accomplish what you want. This is not a great solution because xts objects must be ordered by time, but data.table objects do not have to be. Also, it may not be terribly fast since there is some redundant work being done by xts and data.table. Nonetheless, I thought it might be interesting.

library(data.table)
library(xts)
set.seed(1); N = 1e5;
# I tweaked the following line to make this reproducible in other timezones.
DT = data.table(dts = .POSIXct(1e5*rnorm(N), tz="GMT"))
setkey(DT, dts)  # must sort on time first so that the `xts` object we're about 
                 # to create has the same order
DT[, XTS:=xts(rep(NA, .N), dts)]  # add a dummy xts object as a column
DT[XTS["T00:00:00/T11:59:59.999999", which=TRUE]][, list(dts)] 
                       dts
    1: 1969-12-27 00:28:41
    2: 1969-12-27 00:34:00
    3: 1969-12-27 03:11:21
    4: 1969-12-27 04:20:27
    5: 1969-12-28 00:00:21
   ---                    
49825: 1970-01-05 08:05:22
49826: 1970-01-05 09:35:32
49827: 1970-01-05 09:49:49
49828: 1970-01-05 09:50:27
49829: 1970-01-05 11:07:32

The above uses an xts-style subsetting string to get the rows where the time is between 00:00:00 and 12:00:00 for every day. Using which=TRUE returns the row number instead of the data from that row, so that we can subset the data.table by those rows.

You could use a string like "1970-01-01" to get all data from that day, or "1970-01" to get all data from January 1970, or "1970-01-01/1970-01-02" to get all rows from those two days.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, as you point out, the ordering (setkey operation) seems to be expensive on bigger tables (1e7). And for some reason, the test result with 1e7 rows (seed = 1) gives about 60 rows more in your solution (maybe it's got to do with the milliseconds?) –  Arun Apr 7 '13 at 22:07
    
@Arun "T00:00:00/T12:00:00" will also include times up to but not including 12:00:01. I have edited to use a more precise subset string that gives the same number of rows as the OP. –  GSee Apr 7 '13 at 22:31
    
Thanks Gsee, though I find this x2 time less efficient than based method (function f), and that's without the sorting –  statquant Apr 9 '13 at 10:11

A late entry, but I think that the as.POSIXlt solution will create a named list of vectors, of which you only want the hour

I would key by an ITime column and then use a binary search to subset those times before 12pm

There are 60*60 *12 - 1 seconds before 12pm so seq_len(43199) will return everything up to (but not including) 12pm

# create IDate and ITime columns and key by time
setkey(DT[, c('Date','Time') := IDateTime(dts)],Time)

# subset times before 12pm
DT[.(seq_len(43199))]
share|improve this answer
    
That's very good actually, let me test the leap years and summer time stuff, it is always more tricky than it seems. Thanks –  statquant Apr 16 '13 at 6:56

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