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I'm just revising chapter 4 of C# in Depth which deals with nullable types, and I'm adding a section about using the "as" operator, which allows you to write:

object o = ...;
int? x = o as int?;
if (x.HasValue)
{
    ... // Use x.Value in here
}

I thought this was really neat, and that it could improve performance over the C# 1 equivalent, using "is" followed by a cast - after all, this way we only need to ask for dynamic type checking once, and then a simple value check.

This appears not to be the case, however. I've included a sample test app below, which basically sums all the integers within an object array - but the array contains a lot of null references and string references as well as boxed integers. The benchmark measures the code you'd have to use in C# 1, the code using the "as" operator, and just for kicks a LINQ solution. To my astonishment, the C# 1 code is 20 times faster in this case - and even the LINQ code (which I'd have expected to be slower, given the iterators involved) beats the "as" code.

Is the .NET implementation of isinst for nullable types just really slow? Is it the additional unbox.any that causes the problem? Is there another explanation for this? At the moment it feels like I'm going to have to include a warning against using this in performance sensitive situations...

Results:

Cast: 10000000 : 121
As: 10000000 : 2211
LINQ: 10000000 : 2143

Code:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;

class Test
{
    const int Size = 30000000;

    static void Main()
    {
        object[] values = new object[Size];
        for (int i = 0; i < Size - 2; i += 3)
        {
            values[i] = null;
            values[i+1] = "";
            values[i+2] = 1;
        }

        FindSumWithCast(values);
        FindSumWithAs(values);
        FindSumWithLinq(values);
    }

    static void FindSumWithCast(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            if (o is int)
            {
                int x = (int) o;
                sum += x;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Cast: {0} : {1}", sum, 
                          (long) sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithAs(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            int? x = o as int?;
            if (x.HasValue)
            {
                sum += x.Value;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("As: {0} : {1}", sum, 
                          (long) sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithLinq(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = values.OfType<int>().Sum();
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("LINQ: {0} : {1}", sum, 
                          (long) sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}
share|improve this question
50  
oh sure, you update everything the week after I buy it ;) –  Leroy Jenkins Oct 17 '09 at 20:26
7  
Why not look at the jitted code? Even VS debugger can show it. –  Anton Tykhyy Oct 17 '09 at 20:28
2  
I'm just curious, did you test with CLR 4.0 as well? –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Oct 17 '09 at 20:32
6  
@Downvoter: Care to comment why? –  Jon Skeet Nov 16 '09 at 22:01
3  
@Lepp it makes perfect sense for it to not work on value types. Think about it, as attempts to cast to a type and if it fails then it returns null. You can't set value types to null –  Earlz Jun 19 '10 at 18:53

9 Answers 9

up vote 121 down vote accepted
+100

Clearly the machine code the JIT compiler can generate for the first case is much more efficient. One rule that really helps there is that an object can only be unboxed to a variable that has the same type as the boxed value. That allows the JIT compiler to generate very efficient code, no value conversions have to be considered.

The is operator test is easy, just check if the object isn't null and is of the expected type, takes but a few machine code instructions. The cast is also easy, the JIT compiler knows the location of the value bits in the object and uses them directly. No copying or conversion occurs, all machine code is inline and takes but about a dozen instructions. This needed to be really efficient back in .NET 1.0 when boxing was common.

Casting to int? takes a lot more work. The value representation of the boxed integer is not compatible with the memory layout of Nullable<int>. A conversion is required and the code is tricky due to possible boxed enum types. The JIT compiler generates a call to a CLR helper function named JIT_Unbox_Nullable to get the job done. This is a general purpose function for any value type, lots of code there to check types. And the value is copied. Hard to estimate the cost since this code is locked up inside mscorwks.dll, but hundreds of machine code instructions is likely.

The Linq OfType() extension method also uses the is operator and the cast. This is however a cast to a generic type. The JIT compiler generates a call to a helper function, JIT_Unbox() that can perform a cast to an arbitrary value type. I don't have a great explanation why it is as slow as the cast to Nullable<int>, given that less work ought to be necessary. I suspect that ngen.exe might cause trouble here.

share|improve this answer
9  
Okay, I'm convinced. I guess I'm used to thinking of "is" as potentially expensive because of the possibilities of walking up an inheritance hierarchy - but in the case of a value type, there's no possibility of a hierarchy, so it can be a simple bitwise comparison. I still think the JIT code for the nullable case could be optimised by the JIT a lot more heavily than it is though. –  Jon Skeet Jun 19 '10 at 18:21
6  
OT: I've only just seen your profile; I didn't realise SO had absorbed "nobugz". A belated welcome, from a fellow MSDN escapee. –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '10 at 20:54

It seems to me that the isinst is just really slow on nullable types. In method FindSumWithCast I changed

if (o is int)

to

if (o is int?)

which also significantly slows down execution. The only differenc in IL I can see is that

isinst     [mscorlib]System.Int32

gets changed to

isinst     valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32>
share|improve this answer
    
It's more than that; in the "cast" case the isinst is followed by a test for nullity and then conditionally an unbox.any. In the nullable case there's an unconditional unbox.any. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '09 at 20:14
    
Yes, turns out both isinst and unbox.any are slower on nullable types. –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Oct 17 '09 at 20:26
    
@Jon: You can review my answer as for why the cast is needed. (I know this is old, but I just discovered this q and thought I should provide my 2c of what I know about the CLR). –  Johannes Rudolph Aug 17 '11 at 20:24

Interestingly, I passed on feedback about operator support via dynamic being an order-of-magnitude slower for Nullable<T> (similar to this early test) - I suspect for very similar reasons.

Gotta love Nullable<T>. Another fun one is that even though the JIT spots (and removes) null for non-nullable structs, it borks it for Nullable<T>:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
static class Program {
    static void Main() { 
        // JIT
        TestUnrestricted<int>(1,5);
        TestUnrestricted<string>("abc",5);
        TestUnrestricted<int?>(1,5);
        TestNullable<int>(1, 5);

        const int LOOP = 100000000;
        Console.WriteLine(TestUnrestricted<int>(1, LOOP));
        Console.WriteLine(TestUnrestricted<string>("abc", LOOP));
        Console.WriteLine(TestUnrestricted<int?>(1, LOOP));
        Console.WriteLine(TestNullable<int>(1, LOOP));

    }
    static long TestUnrestricted<T>(T x, int loop) {
        Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < loop; i++) {
            if (x != null) count++;
        }
        watch.Stop();
        return watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    }
    static long TestNullable<T>(T? x, int loop) where T : struct {
        Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < loop; i++) {
            if (x != null) count++;
        }
        watch.Stop();
        return watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yowser. That's a really painful difference. Eek. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '09 at 21:32
    
Hence some of the obscure code in MiscUtil/Operator ;-p –  Marc Gravell Oct 17 '09 at 21:36
    
If no other good has come out of all of this, it's led me to include warnings for both my original code and this :) –  Jon Skeet Oct 18 '09 at 11:52
    
I know this is an old question, but could you explain what you mean by "the JIT spots (and removes) null for non-nullable structs"? Do you mean it replaces null with a default value or something during runtime? –  Justin Morgan Apr 21 '11 at 21:23
1  
@Justin - a generic method can be used at runtime with any number of permutations of generic-parameters (T etc). The stack etc requirements depend on the args (amount of stack space for a local, etc), so you get one JIT for any unique permutation involving a value type. However, references are all the same size so share a JIT. While doing the per-value-type JIT, it can check for a few obvious scenarios, and tries to excise unreachable code due to things like impossible nulls. It isn't perfect, note. Also, I'm ignoring AOT for the above. –  Marc Gravell Apr 21 '11 at 21:32

This is the result of FindSumWithAsAndHas above: alt text

This is the result of FindSumWithCast: alt text

Findings:

  • Using as, it test first if an object is an instance of Int32; under the hood it is using isinst Int32 (which is similar to hand-written code: if (o is int) ). And using as, it also unconditionally unbox the object. And it's a real performance-killer to call a property(it's still a function under the hood), IL_0027

  • Using cast, you test first if object is an int if (o is int); under the hood this is using isinst Int32. If it is an instance of int, then you can safely unbox the value, IL_002D

Simply put, this is the pseudo-code of using as approach:

int? x;

(x.HasValue, x.Value) = (o isinst Int32, o unbox Int32)

if (x.HasValue)
    sum += x.Value;    

And this is the pseudo-code of using cast approach:

if (o isinst Int32)
    sum += (o unbox Int32)

So the cast ((int)a[i], well the syntax looks like a cast, but it's actually unboxing, cast and unboxing share the same syntax, next time I'll be pedantic with the right terminology) approach is really faster, you only needed to unbox a value when an object is decidedly an int. The same thing can't be said to using an as approach.

share|improve this answer

This originally started out as a Comment to Hans Passants excellent answer, but it got too long so I want to add a few bits here:

First, the C# as operator will emit an isinst IL instruction (so does the is operator). (Side note: the other interesting instruction is castclass, emited when you do a direct cast and the compiler knows that runtime checking cannot be ommited)..

Here is what it does (ECMA 335 Partition III, 4.6):

Format: isinst typeTok

  • typeTok is a metadata token (a typeref, typedef or typespec), indicating the desired class. If
  • typeTok is a non-nullable value type or a generic parameter type it is interpreted as ―boxed‖ typeTok. If
  • typeTok is a nullable type, Nullable, it is interpreted as ―boxed‖ T.

Most importantly:

If the actual type (not the verifier tracked type) of obj is verifier-assignable-to the type typeTok then isinst succeeds and obj (as result) is returned unchanged while verification tracks its type as typeTok. Unlike coercions (§1.6) and conversions (§3.27), isinst never changes the actual type of an object and preserves object identity (see Partition I).

So, the performance killer isn't isinst in this case, but the additional unbox.any. This wasn't clear from Hans Answer, as he looked at the JITed code only. In general, the C# compiler will emit an unbox.any after a isinst T? (but will omit it in case you do isinst T, when T is a reference type).

Why does it do that? isinst T? never has the effect that would have been obvious, i.e. you get back a T?. Instead, all these instructions ensure is that you have a "boxed T" that can be unboxed to T?. To get an actual T?, we still need to unbox our "boxed T" to T?, which is why the compiler emits an unbox.any after isinst. If you think about it, this makes sense because the "box format" for T? is just a "boxed T" and making castclass and isinst perform the unbox would be inconsistent.

Backing up Hans' finding with some information from the Standard, here it goes:

(ECMA 335 Partition III, 4.33): unbox.any

When applied to the boxed form of a value type, the unbox.any instruction extracts the value contained within obj (of type O). (It is equivalent to unbox followed by ldobj.) When applied to a reference type, the unbox.any instruction has the same effect as castclass typeTok.

(ECMA 335 Partition III, 4.32): unbox

[Note: Typically, unbox simply computes the address of the value type that is already present inside of the boxed object. This approach is not possible when unboxing nullable value types. Because Nullable values are converted to boxed Ts during the box operation, an implementation often must manufacture a new Nullable on the heap and compute the address to the newly allocated object. end note]

share|improve this answer

I don't have time to try it, but you may want to have:

foreach (object o in values)
        {
            int? x = o as int?;

as

int? x;
foreach (object o in values)
        {
            x = o as int?;

You are creating a new object each time, which won't completely explain the problem, but may contribute.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried but this seems to have little effect... –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Oct 17 '09 at 20:03
1  
No, I ran that and it is marginally slower. –  Henk Holterman Oct 17 '09 at 20:03
1  
Declaring a variable in a different place only affects the generated code significantly when the variable is captured (at which point it affects the actual semantics) in my experience. Note that it's not creating a new object on the heap, although it's certainly creating a new instance of int? on the stack using unbox.any. I suspect that's the issue - my guess is that hand-crafted IL could beat both options here... although it's also possible that the JIT is optimised to recognise for the is/cast case and only check once. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '09 at 20:08
1  
is/cast is an easy target for optimization, it's such an annoyingly common idiom. –  Anton Tykhyy Oct 17 '09 at 20:26
2  
Local variables are allocated on the stack when the stack frame for the method is created, so where you declare the variable in the method makes no difference at all. (Unless it's in a closure of course, but that's not the case here.) –  Guffa Oct 17 '09 at 21:30

I tried the exact type check construct

typeof(int) == item.GetType(), which performs as fast as the item is int version, and always returns the number (emphasis: even if you wrote a Nullable<int> to the array, you would need to use typeof(int)). You also need an additional null != item check here.

However

typeof(int?) == item.GetType() stays fast (in contrast to item is int?), but always returns false.

The typeof-construct is in my eyes the fastest way for exact type checking, as it uses the RuntimeTypeHandle. Since the exact types in this case don't match with nullable, my guess is, is/as have to do additional heavylifting here on ensuring that it is in fact an instance of a Nullable type.

And honestly: what does your is Nullable<xxx> plus HasValue buy you? Nothing. You can always go directly to the underlying (value) type (in this case). You either get the value or "no, not an instance of the type you were asking for". Even if you wrote (int?)null to the array, the type check will return false.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting... the idea of using the "as" + HasValue (not is plus HasValue, note) is that it's only performing the type check once instead of twice. It's doing the "check and unbox" in a single step. That feels like it should be faster... but it clearly isn't. I'm not sure what you mean by the last sentence, but there's no such thing as a boxed int? - if you box an int? value it ends up as a boxed int or a null reference. –  Jon Skeet Jun 19 '10 at 10:17
using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;

class Test
{
    const int Size = 30000000;

    static void Main()
    {
        object[] values = new object[Size];
        for (int i = 0; i < Size - 2; i += 3)
        {
            values[i] = null;
            values[i + 1] = "";
            values[i + 2] = 1;
        }

        FindSumWithCast(values);
        FindSumWithAsAndHas(values);
        FindSumWithAsAndIs(values);


        FindSumWithIsThenAs(values);
        FindSumWithIsThenConvert(values);

        FindSumWithLinq(values);



        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void FindSumWithCast(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            if (o is int)
            {
                int x = (int)o;
                sum += x;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Cast: {0} : {1}", sum,
                          (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithAsAndHas(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            int? x = o as int?;
            if (x.HasValue)
            {
                sum += x.Value;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("As and Has: {0} : {1}", sum,
                          (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }


    static void FindSumWithAsAndIs(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            int? x = o as int?;
            if (o is int)
            {
                sum += x.Value;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("As and Is: {0} : {1}", sum,
                          (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }







    static void FindSumWithIsThenAs(object[] values)
    {
        // Apple-to-apple comparison with Cast routine above.
        // Using the similar steps in Cast routine above,
        // the AS here cannot be slower than Linq.



        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {

            if (o is int)
            {
                int? x = o as int?;
                sum += x.Value;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Is then As: {0} : {1}", sum,
                          (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithIsThenConvert(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {            
            if (o is int)
            {
                int x = Convert.ToInt32(o);
                sum += x;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Is then Convert: {0} : {1}", sum,
                          (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }



    static void FindSumWithLinq(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = values.OfType<int>().Sum();
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("LINQ: {0} : {1}", sum,
                          (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

Outputs:

Cast: 10000000 : 456
As and Has: 10000000 : 2103
As and Is: 10000000 : 2029
Is then As: 10000000 : 1376
Is then Convert: 10000000 : 566
LINQ: 10000000 : 1811

[EDIT: 2010-06-19]

Note: Previous test was done inside VS, configuration debug, using VS2009, using Core i7(company development machine).

The following was done on my machine using Core 2 Duo, using VS2010

Inside VS, Configuration: Debug

Cast: 10000000 : 309
As and Has: 10000000 : 3322
As and Is: 10000000 : 3249
Is then As: 10000000 : 1926
Is then Convert: 10000000 : 410
LINQ: 10000000 : 2018




Outside VS, Configuration: Debug

Cast: 10000000 : 303
As and Has: 10000000 : 3314
As and Is: 10000000 : 3230
Is then As: 10000000 : 1942
Is then Convert: 10000000 : 418
LINQ: 10000000 : 1944




Inside VS, Configuration: Release

Cast: 10000000 : 305
As and Has: 10000000 : 3327
As and Is: 10000000 : 3265
Is then As: 10000000 : 1942
Is then Convert: 10000000 : 414
LINQ: 10000000 : 1932




Outside VS, Configuration: Release

Cast: 10000000 : 301
As and Has: 10000000 : 3274
As and Is: 10000000 : 3240
Is then As: 10000000 : 1904
Is then Convert: 10000000 : 414
LINQ: 10000000 : 1936
share|improve this answer
    
Which framework version are you using, out of interest? The results on my netbook (using .NET 4RC) are even more dramatic - the versions using As are much worse than your results. Maybe they've improved it for .NET 4 RTM? I still think it could be faster... –  Jon Skeet Apr 21 '10 at 6:06
    
I'm using .NET 3.5 Framework –  Michael Buen Apr 21 '10 at 6:10
    
@Michael: Were you running an unoptimised build, or running in the debugger? –  Jon Skeet Jun 19 '10 at 9:10
    
@Jon: unoptimized build, under debugger –  Michael Buen Jun 19 '10 at 9:52
1  
@Michael: Right - I tend to view performance results under a debugger as largely irrelevant :) –  Jon Skeet Jun 19 '10 at 9:53

Profiling further:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

class Program
{
    const int Size = 30000000;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        object[] values = new object[Size];
        for (int i = 0; i < Size - 2; i += 3)
        {
            values[i] = null;
            values[i + 1] = "";
            values[i + 2] = 1;
        }

        FindSumWithIsThenCast(values);

        FindSumWithAsThenHasThenValue(values);
        FindSumWithAsThenHasThenCast(values);

        FindSumWithManualAs(values);
        FindSumWithAsThenManualHasThenValue(values);



        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void FindSumWithIsThenCast(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            if (o is int)
            {
                int x = (int)o;
                sum += x;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Is then Cast: {0} : {1}", sum,
                            (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithAsThenHasThenValue(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            int? x = o as int?;

            if (x.HasValue)
            {
                sum += x.Value;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("As then Has then Value: {0} : {1}", sum,
                            (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithAsThenHasThenCast(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            int? x = o as int?;

            if (x.HasValue)
            {
                sum += (int)o;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("As then Has then Cast: {0} : {1}", sum,
                            (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithManualAs(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            bool hasValue = o is int;
            int x = hasValue ? (int)o : 0;

            if (hasValue)
            {
                sum += x;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Manual As: {0} : {1}", sum,
                            (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    static void FindSumWithAsThenManualHasThenValue(object[] values)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int sum = 0;
        foreach (object o in values)
        {
            int? x = o as int?;

            if (o is int)
            {
                sum += x.Value;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("As then Manual Has then Value: {0} : {1}", sum,
                            (long)sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

}

Output:

Is then Cast: 10000000 : 303
As then Has then Value: 10000000 : 3524
As then Has then Cast: 10000000 : 3272
Manual As: 10000000 : 395
As then Manual Has then Value: 10000000 : 3282

What can we infer from these figures?

  • First, is-then-cast approach is significantly faster than as approach. 303 vs 3524
  • Second, .Value is marginally slower than casting. 3524 vs 3272
  • Third, .HasValue is marginally slower than using manual has(i.e. using is). 3524 vs 3282
  • Fourth, doing an apple-to-apple comparison(i.e. both assigning of simulated HasValue and converting simulated Value happens together) between simulated as and real as approach, we can see simulated as is still significantly faster than real as. 395 vs 3524
  • Lastly, based on first and fourth conclusion, there's something wrong with as implementation ^_^
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