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Has anyone already implemented a circular buffer in JavaScript? How would you do that without having pointers?

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1  
You probably should clarify "circular buffer". What sort of API interests you? What goes in the buffer? etc etc –  Pointy Oct 17 '09 at 20:33
    
Ideally the API would consist of: push ( key, value ) get ( key ) and when the buffer has reached its maximum size the first saved item is overwritten. –  user191800 Oct 17 '09 at 21:32

9 Answers 9

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Strange co-incidence, I just wrote one earlier today! I don't know what exactly your requirements are but this might be of use.

It presents an interface like an Array of unlimited length, but ‘forgets’ old items:

// Circular buffer storage. Externally-apparent 'length' increases indefinitely
// while any items with indexes below length-n will be forgotten (undefined
// will be returned if you try to get them, trying to set is an exception).
// n represents the initial length of the array, not a maximum
function CircularBuffer(n) {
    this._array= new Array(n);
    this.length= 0;
}
CircularBuffer.prototype.toString= function() {
    return '[object CircularBuffer('+this._array.length+') length '+this.length+']';
};
CircularBuffer.prototype.get= function(i) {
    if (i<0 || i<this.length-this._array.length)
        return undefined;
    return this._array[i%this._array.length];
};
CircularBuffer.prototype.set= function(i, v) {
    if (i<0 || i<this.length-this._array.length)
        throw CircularBuffer.IndexError;
    while (i>this.length) {
        this._array[this.length%this._array.length]= undefined;
        this.length++;
    }
    this._array[i%this._array.length]= v;
    if (i==this.length)
        this.length++;
};
CircularBuffer.IndexError= {};
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Nice. I added push: CircularBuffer.prototype.push = function(v) { this._array[this.length%this._array.length] = v; this.length++; }; –  forresto Oct 2 '13 at 13:46
var createRingBuffer = function(length){

  var pointer = 0, buffer = []; 

  return {
    get  : function(key){return buffer[key];},
    push : function(item){
      buffer[pointer] = item;
      pointer = (length + pointer +1) % length;
    }
  };
};

Update: in case you fill the buffer with numbers only, here are some one liner plugins:

min  : function(){return Math.min.apply(Math, buffer);},
sum  : function(){return buffer.reduce(function(a, b){ return a + b; }, 0);},
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1  
why do you have pointer = (length + pointer +1) % length instead of just pointer = (pointer + 1) % length? –  Muxa May 14 '13 at 3:19

This is a quick mockup of the code you could use (it probably isn't working and has bugs in it, but it shows the way it could be done):

var CircularQueueItem = function(value, next, back) {
    this.next = next;
    this.value = value;
    this.back = back;
    return this;
};

var CircularQueue = function(queueLength){
    /// <summary>Creates a circular queue of specified length</summary>
    /// <param name="queueLength" type="int">Length of the circular queue</type>
    this._current = new CircularQueueItem(undefined, undefined, undefined);
    var item = this._current;
    for(var i = 0; i < queueLength - 1; i++)
    {
        item.next = new CircularQueueItem(undefined, undefined, item);
        item = item.next;
    }
    item.next = this._current;
    this._current.back = item;
}

CircularQueue.prototype.push = function(value){
    /// <summary>Pushes a value/object into the circular queue</summary>
    /// <param name="value">Any value/object that should be stored into the queue</param>
    this._current.value = value;
    this._current = this._current.next;
};

CircularQueue.prototype.pop = function(){
    /// <summary>Gets the last pushed value/object from the circular queue</summary>
    /// <returns>Returns the last pushed value/object from the circular queue</returns>
    this._current = this._current.back;
    return this._current.value;
};

using this object would be like:

var queue = new CircularQueue(10); // a circular queue with 10 items
queue.push(10);
queue.push(20);
alert(queue.pop());
alert(queue.pop());

You could of course implement it using array as well with a class that would internally use an array and keep a value of the current item index and moving that one.

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1  
What's with all those .NET-style doc comments? –  Ionuț G. Stan Oct 17 '09 at 21:25
    
@Ionut: They're Javascript intellisense for Visual Studio 2008+ just in case he's on .net otherwise they'll simply be ignored by other editors. –  Robert Koritnik Oct 17 '09 at 21:52
1  
I had no idea there's support for them in Visual Studio. Thanks for the info. –  Ionuț G. Stan Oct 17 '09 at 22:31
    
@Ionut: Make sure to write the AFTER function declaration and not BEFORE as normal in C#. That's the main difference. Otherwise it works quite similar. –  Robert Koritnik Oct 18 '09 at 8:22
    
Unnecessary XML style markup makes me sad but a big thumbs up for structured documentation –  Steven Lu Oct 6 '13 at 0:30

I really like how noiv11 solved this and for my need I added an extra property 'buffer' which returns the buffer:

var createRingBuffer = function(length){

  var pointer = 0, buffer = []; 

  return {
    get  : function(key){return buffer[key];},
    push : function(item){
      buffer[pointer] = item;
      pointer = (length + pointer +1) % length;
    },
    buffer : buffer
  };
};

// sample use
var rbuffer = createRingBuffer(3);
rbuffer.push('a');
rbuffer.push('b');
rbuffer.push('c');
alert(rbuffer.buffer.toString());
rbuffer.push('d');
alert(rbuffer.buffer.toString());
var el = rbuffer.get(0);
alert(el);
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What a horrible thing to do! The buffer was nicely hidden in the original. –  James Jul 24 at 18:42
    
Agree, no idea why I did it (2 years ago) –  PerS Jul 31 at 20:38

One approach would be to use a linked list as others have suggested. Another technique would be to use a simple array as the buffer and to keep track of the read and write positions via indices into that array.

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I couldn't get Robert Koritnik's code to work, so I edited it to the following which seems to work:

    var CircularQueueItem = function (value, next, back) {
        this.next = next;
        this.value = value;
        this.back = back;
        return this;
    };

    var CircularQueue = function (queueLength) {
        /// <summary>Creates a circular queue of specified length</summary>
        /// <param name="queueLength" type="int">Length of the circular queue</type>
        this._current = new CircularQueueItem(undefined, undefined, undefined);
        var item = this._current;
        for (var i = 0; i < queueLength - 1; i++) {
            item.next = new CircularQueueItem(undefined, undefined, item);
            item = item.next;
        }
        item.next = this._current;
        this._current.back = item;

        this.push = function (value) {
            /// <summary>Pushes a value/object into the circular queue</summary>
            /// <param name="value">Any value/object that should be stored into the queue</param>
            this._current.value = value;
            this._current = this._current.next;
        };
        this.pop = function () {
            /// <summary>Gets the last pushed value/object from the circular queue</summary>
            /// <returns>Returns the last pushed value/object from the circular queue</returns>
            this._current = this._current.back;
            return this._current.value;
        };
        return this;
    }

To use:

    var queue = new CircularQueue(3); // a circular queue with 3 items
    queue.push("a");
    queue.push("b");
    queue.push("c");
    queue.push("d");
    alert(queue.pop()); // d
    alert(queue.pop()); // c
    alert(queue.pop()); // b
    alert(queue.pop()); // d
    alert(queue.pop()); // c
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Because it's a queue and not a stack, should pop() return the first added element instead of the last one? Am I missing something here? For example imagine we have Mike, Lauren and a ticketing booth queue. Mike joins to the end of the queue. After Mike Lauren joins in. Because the queue, Mike will be served first. –  Akseli Palén Feb 16 '13 at 21:36

I use personally the implementation of Trevor Norris that you can find here: https://github.com/trevnorris/cbuffer

and I'm quite happy with it :-)

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I think you should be able to do this by just using objects. Something like this:

var link = function(next, value) {
    this.next = next;
    this.value = value;
};

var last = new link();
var second = link(last);
var first = link(second);
last.next = first;

Now you'd just store the value in each link's value property.

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1  
I believe you forgot to use the new operator. –  Ionuț G. Stan Oct 17 '09 at 21:31
    
Yep, been coding too much Python as of late =) –  Jani Hartikainen Oct 17 '09 at 23:28
    
lol linked lists your code appears C++ –  Abhishek Hingnikar Feb 10 '12 at 18:14

Thanks noiv for your simple and efficient solution. I also needed to be able to access the buffer like PerS did, but i wanted to get the items in the order they were added. So here's what i ended up with:

function buffer(capacity) {
    if (!(capacity > 0)) {
        throw new Error();
    }

    var pointer = 0, buffer = [];

    var publicObj = {
        get: function (key) {
            if (key === undefined) {
                // return all items in the order they were added
                if (pointer == 0 || buffer.length < capacity) {
                    // the buffer as it is now is in order
                    return buffer;
                }
                // split and join the two parts so the result is in order
                return buffer.slice(pointer).concat(buffer.slice(0, pointer));
            }
            return buffer[key];
        },
        push: function (item) {
            buffer[pointer] = item;
            pointer = (capacity + pointer + 1) % capacity;
            // update public length field
            publicObj.length = buffer.length;
        },
        capacity: capacity,
        length: 0
    };

    return publicObj;
}

Here is the test suite:

QUnit.module("buffer");

QUnit.test("constructor", function () {
    QUnit.expect(4);

    QUnit.equal(buffer(1).capacity, 1, "minimum length of 1 is allowed");
    QUnit.equal(buffer(10).capacity, 10);

    QUnit.throws(
        function () {
            buffer(-1);
        },
        Error,
        "must throuw exception on negative length"
    );

    QUnit.throws(
        function () {
            buffer(0);
        },
        Error,
        "must throw exception on zero length"
    );
});

QUnit.test("push", function () {
    QUnit.expect(5);

    var b = buffer(5);
    QUnit.equal(b.length, 0);
    b.push("1");
    QUnit.equal(b.length, 1);
    b.push("2");
    b.push("3");
    b.push("4");
    b.push("5");
    QUnit.equal(b.length, 5);
    b.push("6");
    QUnit.equal(b.length, 5);
    b.push("7");
    b.push("8");
    QUnit.equal(b.length, 5);
});

QUnit.test("get(key)", function () {
    QUnit.expect(8);

    var b = buffer(3);
    QUnit.equal(b.get(0), undefined);
    b.push("a");
    QUnit.equal(b.get(0), "a");
    b.push("b");
    QUnit.equal(b.get(1), "b");
    b.push("c");
    QUnit.equal(b.get(2), "c");
    b.push("d");
    QUnit.equal(b.get(0), "d");

    b = buffer(1);
    b.push("1");
    QUnit.equal(b.get(0), "1");
    b.push("2");
    QUnit.equal(b.get(0), "2");
    QUnit.equal(b.length, 1);
});

QUnit.test("get()", function () {
    QUnit.expect(7);

    var b = buffer(3);
    QUnit.deepEqual(b.get(), []);
    b.push("a");
    QUnit.deepEqual(b.get(), ["a"]);
    b.push("b");
    QUnit.deepEqual(b.get(), ["a", "b"]);
    b.push("c");
    QUnit.deepEqual(b.get(), ["a", "b", "c"]);
    b.push("d");
    QUnit.deepEqual(b.get(), ["b", "c", "d"]);
    b.push("e");
    QUnit.deepEqual(b.get(), ["c", "d", "e"]);
    b.push("f");
    QUnit.deepEqual(b.get(), ["d", "e", "f"]);
});
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