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I'm sorry if the question is a bit vague so i'll try to explain it.

I got this code:

    public String toString()
{
    String s = "text.\n";

    for (Klus k : alleKlussen)
    {
        s += k.toString() + ".\n";
    }
    return s;
}

But I want to make different loops for different conditions. For example, "Klus" has a couple of variables like: status, date etc.

I'm not very experienced with java yet, but would it be possible to do something like this:

for (Klus k : alleKlussen; status = "completed")
{..}

I know this is wrong but I'd like it to show all "Klus" objects where the status is "completed" and all "Klus" objects where the statis is "not completed".

Thanks and if anything is unclear or I used the wrong word for something, please tell me.

Edit:

It should make something like this:

if (k.getStatus().equals("completed"){
  String s = "completed ones \n"
  s += k.toString() + ".\n"; //get all completed ones
}
if (k.getStatus().equals("uncompleted"){
      String s = "uncompleted ones \n"
      s += k.toString() + ".\n"; //get all uncompleted ones
    }
share|improve this question
2  
Please use a StringBuilder for iterative String concatenation! So much object burn... – Quetzalcoatl Apr 5 '13 at 11:04
    
Inside your for loop you'll just be wanting an if surely? – Quetzalcoatl Apr 5 '13 at 11:06
1  
I think I explained it a bit wrong, I edited my question – colin Apr 5 '13 at 11:09
    
your edit basically shows the answer. I fail to see the question now. – Joeri Hendrickx Apr 5 '13 at 11:16
    
What version of java you are using? – IndoKnight Apr 5 '13 at 11:20
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simply add the condition inside the for() loop:

for (Klus k : alleKlussen) {
    if (k.getStatus().equals("completed")) {
        s += k.toString() + ".\n";
    }
}

From the additional information in the question, it seems like the following is what is intended:

String completed = "completed ones \n";
String uncompleted = "uncompleted ones \n";

for (Klus k : alleKlussen) {

    if (k.getStatus().equals("completed")) {
      completed += k.toString() + ".\n"; //get all completed ones
    }
    else if (k.getStatus().equals("uncompleted")) {
       uncompleted += k.toString() + ".\n"; //get all uncompleted ones
    }
}

You should also consider using a StringBuilder to create the result strings, which reduces the memory overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I forgot about the if statement but it's not exactly what I'm looking for, I think I explained it a bit wrong. I edited my question – colin Apr 5 '13 at 11:10
    
+1 for being the simplest correct answer :) – Joeri Hendrickx Apr 5 '13 at 11:15
    
This works for all completed ones, but how should i do the same for the uncompleted ones? just make another for-loop in the toString()? – colin Apr 5 '13 at 11:16
    
@colin check my updated answer - is this what you need? You have two different Strings afterwards, containing information from completed and uncompleted objects. You could use two for() loops, but then you would need to iterate your list twice – Andreas Fester Apr 5 '13 at 11:19
1  
Thanks, this did it for me. I just needed a list with the completed and uncompleted ones and this does just that! – colin Apr 5 '13 at 11:27

You can use switch if you have many conditions and it is easy to read

for (Klus k : alleKlussen) {

switch(k.getStatus()){
       case "completed": ....
                          break;

       case "uncompleted": ....
                            break;

        default: ...
}

}

Please note switch with String literals is only supported in Java 7.

share|improve this answer
    
Why, this would be a perfect case for enums, even if String literals are supported – Simon Hellinger Apr 5 '13 at 11:10
    
Thanks for your answer, but how should it select only the "Klus" objects with "completed" in that case? – colin Apr 5 '13 at 11:11
    
@Colin It is not possible to "just" get "Klus" objects depending on object status in this scenario. You need to iterate through the objects and check. – IndoKnight Apr 5 '13 at 11:13
    
@Simon I agree, but in the original question the user is not using enums. He is using status as String literals. – IndoKnight Apr 5 '13 at 11:15
    
@Indoknight Quite correct. – Simon Hellinger Apr 5 '13 at 11:23
   Use this - this toString will print only Klus are completed.
 public String toString()
    {
        String s = "text.\n";

        for (Klus k : alleKlussen)
        {
            if("completed".equals(k.getStatus ()))
            s += k.toString() + ".\n";
        }
        return s;
    }
share|improve this answer

Why not just do the standard if-conditionals, such as:

if ("".equals(k.getStatus())) {

} else if ("completed".equals(k.getStatus())) {

}
share|improve this answer
4  
A person with 20k rep suggestion to use == for String value comparison? Unbelievable. – R.J Apr 5 '13 at 11:05
2  
@R.J That wasn't my suggestion, my suggestion was to use a standard convention in most languages - if statements - the equality check was incidentally my lack of knowledge of Java specifically, but I don't think that detracts from the actual suggestion. Unbelievably judgmental, maybe, as if you expect I got 20k rep in the java. – Grant Thomas Apr 5 '13 at 11:07
    
And thank you, @Qwerky, for the constructive edit. – Grant Thomas Apr 5 '13 at 11:09
2  
@R.J fixing > complaining – Qwerky Apr 5 '13 at 11:11

To append the uncompleted after the completed ones, try this (And I suggest using enums, but you are welcome to stick to Strings. But then this will only work in Java SE 7!):

State.java:

// Makes switches easy to use and String typos are impossible
public enum State { COMPLETE, INCOMPLETE };

Replace your current String "state" with the enum like so:

Klus:java

public class Klus {
   private State state;
   ...
   public State getState() { return this.state; }
   ...
}

Now use it in a switch in the for loop. Use two strings, one for complete, one for incomplete. Append them in the end. (Note the use of StringBuilder instead of str +=... )

Class containing your toString():

public String toString() {
    StringBuilder complete = new StringBuilder("completed ones \n"), 
                  uncompleted = new StringBuilder("uncompleted ones \n");
    for(Klus k : alleKlussen) {
       switch(k.getStatus())
       case COMPLETE:
          complete.append(k.toString()).append(".\n"); break;
       case INCOMPLETE:
          uncompleted.append(k.toString()).append(".\n"); break;
       default:
       }
    }

    complete.append(uncompleted.toString();

    return complete.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, I see a lot of things I haven't heard about yet. But maybe in the final version I could also use this method for the statuses. Thanks. – colin Apr 5 '13 at 11:31
    
@colin you're welcome. Andreas' answer helps you out without all the extra bells and whistles, though :-D Have fun coding! – Simon Hellinger Apr 5 '13 at 11:36

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