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Say I have a function (it doesn't have any practical application, just an academic interest, thus weird way to write it, with monoids, applicative functors and fixpoint combinators)

f :: Num a => a -> Sum a
f = fix ((<>) <$> Sum <*>)

It typechecks, but I can't be sure it does what it is expected to do before I can test it.

How would one go about testing and/or debugging it? I mean something like seeing the result after several iterations like it is possible with take 10 [1..].

I know a little about simple debugging facilities of ghci like :break and :step, but it steps into non-terminating calculation so I can't inspect anything (it's even problematic to ^C it). And I can't figure how to use trace from Debug module in this function either.

Any pointers would be appreciated.

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Well, you easily see what it does if you expand it to f = fix (\g -> \x -> Sum x <> g x) –  phg Apr 5 '13 at 12:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Package ChasingBottoms with its approxShow can help you explore partially evaluated values:

$ cabal install ChasingBottoms
$ ghci
> import Test.ChasingBottoms.ApproxShow
> import Data.Function
> approxShow 10 (fix (1:))
"[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, _"

However, here we can’t use it directly: summation over Integers is strict, unlike (:) which is used to build a list. Therefore another type should be used.

First, some imports (we also need to be able to derive Data, so that approxShow could be used to show our custom type):

{-# LANGUAGE DeriveDataTypeable #-}

import Data.Data
import Data.Monoid
import Data.Function
import Control.Applicative
import Test.ChasingBottoms.ApproxShow

The type itself (very basic), and its Num instance:

data S = N Integer | S :+ S
  deriving (Typeable, Data)

instance Num S where
  (+) = (:+)
  fromInteger = N
  --other operations do not need to be implemented

Finally, the function:

f :: S -> Sum S
f = fix ((<>) <$> Sum <*>)

And here is how we can see what f is doing with, say, a common number such as 1:

*Main> approxShow 5 (getSum (f 1))
"(N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N _) :+ (_ :+ _))))"

Of course, it may be more interesting to watch the evolution:

*Main> Control.Monad.forM_ [0..7] $ \i -> putStrLn $ approxShow i (getSum (f 1))
_
_ :+ _
(N _) :+ (_ :+ _)
(N 1) :+ ((N _) :+ (_ :+ _))
(N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N _) :+ (_ :+ _)))
(N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N _) :+ (_ :+ _))))
(N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N _) :+ (_ :+ _)))))
(N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N 1) :+ ((N _) :+ (_ :+ _))))))
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1  
+1, thanks for sharing –  max taldykin Apr 5 '13 at 13:09
    
Thanks, I don't seem to be able to apply it as is to my function though: approxShow 5 (f 1) results in No instance for (Data.Data.Data (Sum Integer)). And doing approxShow 10 (getSum (f 1)) does not terminate either. –  dmedvinsky Apr 5 '13 at 15:19
    
@dmedvinsky: sorry, my bad (to be honest, I’ve never heard about Sum before and thought that it was some custom type, so I hadn’t bothered myself to check). Answer updated. –  Artyom Kazak Apr 5 '13 at 17:33
    
It’s quite interesting that neither hat nor vacuum were able to help me. At least, I couldn’t find an easy way to accomplish the task while keeping to Integers. –  Artyom Kazak Apr 5 '13 at 20:28
    
Thanks a lot, Artyom! –  dmedvinsky Apr 8 '13 at 7:25

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