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I need to create an area on which one would normally apply a scrollbar, it has to scroll horizontally (the contents is only a view into a larger logical area), but I have to use some special controls placed left and right to the control in order to scroll.

I have thougth about using absolute values (according to the logical view and subtract an offset. Thus, the controls right to the offset would be placed with negative x- values and thus discarded. Controls with x values above the width would also be discarded.

Is this a valid approach?

Best regards Soeren

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Also consider using the existing scroll actions, as shown here. –  trashgod Apr 5 '13 at 14:12
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can can create a JScrollPane over a Component (your larger logical area) and remove the scrollbars.

You can then add buttons to scroll left and right. When clicked these buttons should move the view of your scrollpane. This is done by setting the absolute position of the view. You can make this relative by first getting the absolute position of the view and then incrementing/decrementing it and setting it again.

Here's a class that shows a scrollable window of a larger image.

public class ViewScroller {

  public ViewScroller() {
    JFrame frame = new JFrame("ViewScroller");
    final ImageIcon image = new ImageIcon("path\\to\\my\\image");
    JLabel label = new JLabel(image);
    final JScrollPane scrollPane = new JScrollPane(label);
    scrollPane.setHorizontalScrollBarPolicy(JScrollPane.HORIZONTAL_SCROLLBAR_NEVER);
    scrollPane.setVerticalScrollBarPolicy(JScrollPane.VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_NEVER);

    JButton left = new JButton("<");
    left.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
      @Override
      public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        Point p = scrollPane.getViewport().getViewPosition();
        p.x = p.x < 10 ? 0 : p.x - 10;
        scrollPane.getViewport().setViewPosition(p);
      }
    });

    JButton right = new JButton(">");
    right.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
      @Override
      public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        Point p = scrollPane.getViewport().getViewPosition();
        int offset = p.x + scrollPane.getViewport().getWidth();
        p.x = offset + 10 > image.getIconWidth() ? p.x : p.x + 10;
        scrollPane.getViewport().setViewPosition(p);
      }
    });

    frame.add(right, BorderLayout.EAST);
    frame.add(left, BorderLayout.WEST);
    frame.add(scrollPane, BorderLayout.CENTER);

    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    frame.setSize(400, 400);
    frame.setVisible(true);
  }
}
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Wow, thank you so much "Qwerky", I will try this out - this looks perfect :) –  Soeren Dalby Apr 5 '13 at 11:58
    
@SoerenDalby just updated with code for a class that I tested –  Qwerky Apr 5 '13 at 12:00
    
Hi I have now implemented "Qwerky" principle and it works like a charm. There is one thing however, the way my control works, the user would expect the scrollpane to scroll when the mouse remains pressed on the scroller control. Does any of you have hint on how to get there? –  Soeren Dalby Apr 9 '13 at 14:31
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