Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Given a project with <packaging>something-not-jar</packaging>, how does one:

  1. tell the maven-jar-plugin to produce the "normal" jar file and tell the maven-install-plugin to take that normal jar file and
  2. install that to the local repository (in addition to the something-not-jar artifact that was produced)

If I tell the jar plugin to produce a test-jar, then it does that and the install plugin installs the xxx-0.0.1-SNAPSHOT-tests.jar to the local repo. But the "jar" goal apparently does not cause the resulting jar file to be installed in the local repo, even though the jar file is created in the target folder.

So how do I do this?

share|improve this question
    
Jar plugin is meant to produce a jar, not install it. If you want to install a jar during the jar phase, just configure the install plugin to be executed during that jar phase. –  Tome Apr 5 '13 at 13:01
    
Post your pom.xml file along with the actual command you're executing. –  carlspring Apr 5 '13 at 13:31
    
Did you find a solution for this question? –  pbal Feb 24 '14 at 14:43

1 Answer 1

You should simply do the following:

mvn install
share|improve this answer
    
This will install the artifact indicated by the project packaging. However, no jar file is installed to the local repo. –  user1283068 Apr 5 '13 at 13:27
    
If this is the case your pom.xml is not correct. Can you post the pom file? –  khmarbaise Apr 5 '13 at 13:54
    
Why would my pom be incorrect? A pom with a specific packaging would not necessarily produce a jar artifact. Only when I include the jar plugin with goal "jar" in my build section, a jar file is produced in the target folder. But the maven install plugin doesn't see that jar file as an "artifact" that was produced by the build and therefore should be installed. –  user1283068 Apr 8 '13 at 7:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.