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I currently use this approach to obtain the correct relative URI (independent of the deployment situation). Razor code (asp.net mvc 3):

@section JavaScript
{  
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var _getUrl =  "@Url.Content("~/bla/di/bla")";
    </script>
}

Separate js file:

$.ajax({
    url: _getUrl,

Do you reckon there is a better approach?

share|improve this question
    
Your scripts should be in a separate minimizable/cachable js file. –  asawyer Apr 5 '13 at 12:42
    
I do the same, but I'm not sure if it's a good thing to do. +1 for question :) –  Mariusz.W Apr 5 '13 at 12:49
2  
@asawyer - not sure what the point of your comment is ... –  csetzkorn Apr 5 '13 at 13:28
    
@asawyer "should" is not the correct word. In .NET 4.5 you can do this, however, you couldn't solve this issue with that! –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Apr 5 '13 at 13:38
    
@LiverpoolsNumber9 The only issue I see here is that csetzkorn should be using @Url.Action or possibly @Url.RouteUrl not @Url.Content –  asawyer Apr 5 '13 at 13:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Personally I prefer using HTML5 data-* attributes or including the URL as part of some DOM element that I unobtrusively AJAXify.

The thing is that you never write $.ajax calls flying around like that. You write them to correspond to some DOM events. Like for example clicking of an anchor. In this case it's trivial, you just use an HTML helper to generate this anchor:

@Html.ActionLink("click me", "someAction", "somecontroller", new { id = "123" }, new { @class = "link" })

and then:

$('.link').click(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: this.href,
        type: 'GET',
        success: function(result) {
            ...
        }

    });
    return false;
});

or maybe you are AJAXifying a form:

@using (Html.BeginForm("SomeAction", "SomeController", FormMethod.Post, new { id = "myForm" }))
{
    ...
}

and then:

$('#myForm').submit(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: this.action,
        type: this.method,
        data: $(this).serialize(),
        success: function(result) {
            ...
        }
    });
    return false;
});

Another example would be to use HTML5 data-* attributes when an appropriate url is not available on the corresponding DOM element. Suppose that you want to invoke a controller action with AJAX when the selection of a dropdown changes. Think for example cascading ddls.

Here's how your dropdown might look like:

@Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedValue, Model.Values, new { id = "myDdl", data_url = Url.Action("SomeAction") })

and then:

$('#myDdl').change(function() {
    var url = $(this).data('url');
    var selectedValue =  $(this).val();
    $.getJSON(url, { id: selectedValue }, function(result) {
        ...
    });
});

So as you can see you don't really need this _getUrl global javascript variable that you declared in your view.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I was about to type up an example of this but you have it succinctness written. Plus I should point out I'm pretty sure I learned the technique from you. –  asawyer Apr 5 '13 at 13:45
    
@darin-dimitrov that's a pretty good answer. Although may add unneccessary html to the page in certain circumstances (eg if a "click" didn't make sense and you needed to use a hidden field or other DOM element just to store the value). –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Apr 5 '13 at 13:50
3  
Why would it be unnecessary? This allows for your application still function even with javascript disabled. This is called progressive enhancement. –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 5 '13 at 13:51
    
@darindimitrov Yes, but that wasn't the question. If he'd have asked "how do I get the url from a hyperlink and make an ajax call with it" then your answer would be perfect. –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Apr 5 '13 at 13:59
    
@LiverpoolsNumber9, that's probably because the OP didn't know about this technique. Now that he knows it he realizes that he doesn't need the global javascript variable in his view at all. –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 5 '13 at 14:00

I would do the following:

Razor C# script before Javascript

@{
    var myUrlString = Url.Action("ActionName", new { controller="ControllerName" });
}

JavaScript

$.ajax('@myUrlString',{
    // options
});

You could also use Url.RouteUrl or Url.HttpRouteUrl.

EDIT - showing example with separated JS file

Razor

@{
    var myServerGeneratedValue = Url.Action("ActionName", new{controller="ControllerName"});
}
<script type="text/javascript">
    var myHelperObject = new MyHelperObject();
    myHelperObject.Init('@myServerGeneratedValue');
</script>

JS file

var MyHelperObject = function(){

    this.Init = function(serverGeneratedValue){
        // do something with serverGeneratedValue
    };

};
share|improve this answer
    
The action name can be a string, the anon type is unnecessary. –  asawyer Apr 5 '13 at 13:44
    
I like this as it makes sure that the outgoing URIs are kept in synch if the routing changes. However, this requires the javascript code to sit in the view! –  csetzkorn Apr 5 '13 at 13:45
    
@asawyer The action name is a string and the "anon type" is necessary if you are routing to a different controller / area from the current. Also how would you add IDs or any other routing data without it?? –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Apr 5 '13 at 13:45
    
@LiverpoolsNumber9 Er sorry I meant Controller name. –  asawyer Apr 5 '13 at 13:47
1  
This will only work with inline javascript. In a separate javascript files (which of course is the correct place to put your js logic) you cannot use server side helpers. –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 5 '13 at 13:50

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