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Assuming I need to increment the Value of an entry in a Dictionary, e.g.:

public void Increment( string key, int increment )
{
    m_dict[key] += increment;
}

And also assuming I need to make it work when there is no entry for key, e.g.:

public void Increment( string key, int increment )
{
    if ( m_dict.ContainsKey( key ) )
    {
        m_dict[key] += increment;
    }
    else
    {
        m_dict[key] = increment;
    }
}

Is there a way to reduce the number of key lookups down to one?

The best solution I could think of is the following, which is a bit clunky and uses two lookups:

public void Increment( string key, int increment )
{
    long value;
    if ( m_dict.TryGetValue( key, out value ) )
    {
        m_dict[key] = value + increment;
    }
    else
    {
        m_dict.Add( key, increment );
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
That's the best you can get. –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 5 '13 at 13:03
    
Why not use the second code block and replace m_dict[key] = increment with m_dict.Add(key, increment)? –  John Willemse Apr 5 '13 at 13:08
    
@JohnWillemse because that would still be three lookups in the first case. One for ContainsKey and two for +=, I guess. –  LumpN Apr 8 '13 at 8:42

2 Answers 2

I'm not certain whether it only does the one lookup under the hood, but ConcurrentDictionary has an AddOrUpdate method that has the behaviour you're looking for, but as I said, I can't be sure of the number of lookups.

See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/ee378675.aspx

Furthermore, I believe Dictionary has the automatic AddOrUpdate behaviour:

_dict["key"] = 12 will always mutate or add depending on whether it exists already.

share|improve this answer
1  
AddOrUpdate is exactly what I need. Too bad there is no such thing for Dictionary. The item accessor this[TKey key] is actually more like AddOrReplace. –  LumpN Apr 8 '13 at 8:45

You can use something like that.

public class Holder {
    public long Value { get; set; }
}

public void Increment(Dictionary<string, Holder> dict, string key, int increment) {
        Holder box;
        if(dict.TryGetValue(key, out box)) box.Value += increment;
        else {
            dict[key] = new Holder {
                Value = increment
            };
        }
    }

the wrapper class will have not noticeable impact on performance because this is almost equal to the boxin/unboxing happening already (I think).

I did a small test and performance seems better, you must confirm if the performance in all your use cases is better.

  [Fact]
        public void benchmark_dictionary() {
            var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, long> {
                {"a", 1},
                {"b", 2},
                {"c", 3}
            };

            var dictionary2 = new Dictionary<string, Holder> {
                {
                    "a", new Holder() {
                        Value = 1
                    }
                }, {
                    "b", new Holder() {
                        Value = 2
                    }
                }, {
                    "c", new Holder() {
                        Value = 3
                    }
                }
            };

            var iterations = 1000000;
            var timer = new Stopwatch();
            timer.Start();
            for(int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
                Increment(dictionary, "a", 1);
            timer.Stop();

            // DumpOnConsole() -> Console.WriteLine( objetc ) 
            timer.ElapsedMilliseconds.DumpOnConsole();

            dictionary.DumpOnConsole();

            timer.Restart();

            for(int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
                Increment(dictionary2, "a", 1);
            timer.Stop();

            timer.ElapsedMilliseconds.DumpOnConsole();

            dictionary2.DumpOnConsole();
        }

Regards.

share|improve this answer
    
I like how the Holder reduces the number of lookups to one, in case the key is already in the dictionary. –  LumpN Apr 8 '13 at 8:40

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