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I have html page with javascript:

<!DOCTYPE html>

    <html>

        <head>
            <script>
                function doWork() {
                     console.log("\tdoWork-start");
                     var now = new Date();
                     var end = now.getTime() + 2000;
                     while(now < end) {
                        now = new Date();
                     }
                     console.log("\tdoWork-end");
                }

                function handleOnClick() {
                    console.log("onclick-start");
                    console.log("onclick-end");
                }

                function handleOnchange() {
                    console.log("onchange-start");
                    window.open('', 'name', 'height=300,width=600,top=200,left=200');
                    doWork();
                    console.log("onchange-end");
                }
            </script>
        </head>

        <body>
            <form>
                <input type="text" onchange="handleOnchange();">
                <input type="button" value="ok" onclick="handleOnClick();">
            </form>

        </body>

    </html>

Use case: enter some value in input control and quickly click the button. I expect such logs in console:

onchange-start
    doWork-start
    doWork-end
onchange-end
onclick-start
onclick-end

But in Firefox I've got:

onchange-start
onclick-start
onclick-end
    doWork-start
    doWork-end
onchange-end

Notice, that onclick execution interrupts onchange execution. Function doWork emulates some long work. In Chrome it works as expected.

Can anybody explain how is that possible?

share|improve this question
6  
The call to window.open() may interrupt the current event handler and shuffle scheduling so the click handler is invoked next, before the original handler is resumed. Do you get more consistent results if you remove that call? –  Frédéric Hamidi Apr 5 '13 at 13:55
    
MDN window.open says "The window creation and the loading of the referenced resource are done asynchronously." –  fernandosavio Apr 5 '13 at 14:13
    
Frédéric Hamidi, your observation is right. This happens because of window.open(). As I understand, the browser's UI thread interrupts onchange handler in order to open new window and then it should resume it. But instead UI thread picks the next event handler from UI queue. I thought that JavaScript functions are always executed one after another because of single threaded environment. My example shows that it's not always true. Is this correct implementation of Firefox's engine? –  ako Apr 5 '13 at 14:13
    
@fernandosavio We can have several UI events on one page and they all are handled asynchronously, but they never interrupt each other. Why window.open() differs? –  ako Apr 5 '13 at 14:23

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