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Found some interesting code snippet today. Simplified, it looks like this:

$var = null;

$var or $var = '123';

$var or $var = '312';

var_dump($var);

The thing is that, as i know, precedence of assignment is higher that OR, so, as i assume, var_dump should output 312 (first - assign, second - compare logically). But result is defferent, i getting 123 (first - check if $var converting to true, second - if not, assign value). The questions is how does it work? Why behavior is the same for or and ||?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can see examples about this behaviour in Logical Operators

Also you can read artical about Short-circuit evaluation

The short-circuit expression x Sand y (using Sand to denote the short-circuit variety) is equivalent to the conditional expression if x then y else false; the expression x Sor y is equivalent to if x then true else y.

In php.

return x() and y();

equal to

if (x())
  return (bool)y();
else
  return false;

return x() or y();

equal to

if (x())
  return true;
else
  return (bool)y();

So, deal is not just in precedence.

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1  
That makes sense! Thank you! So, the reason is that Short-circuit operators are, in effect, control structures rather than simple arithmetic operators –  Timur Apr 5 '13 at 14:11

It same as

$var = null;

if(!$var)$var = '123';
if(!$var)$var = '321';

var_dump($var);
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I know that these are the same. I want to know how does it work –  Timur Apr 5 '13 at 14:00
    
It execute string after or (in your case $var = '123';) only if statement before or is empty/false/null/etc... –  Narek Apr 5 '13 at 14:03

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