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I have stored procedure in SQL Server 2012 say spXample and a scaler-valued function say fXample. I call a function fXample from spXample. Can I throw an exception in function and catch it in stored procedure's Catch block and rethrow to the calling C# code?

Update:

The function I wrote like:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.fXample(@i INT) RETURNS TINYINT AS BEGIN RETURN (SELECT CASE WHEN @i < 10 THEN THROW 51000,'Xample Exception',1; ELSE (SELECT @i) END); END GO

I am getting error

Msg 443, Level 16, State 14, Procedure fXample, Line 46 Invalid use of a side-effecting operator 'THROW' within a function.

How do I write alternative code to achieve above functionality.

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Throw an exception in the function based on what type of condition? And what type of function, scalar, TVF, multi-statement TVF? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 5 '13 at 14:41
    
Try RAISERROR: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178592.aspx. If you give it a lower severity, it can be caught by a CATCH. From there, you can call it with a "critical" severity (I think 11+; there are examples on the page) and it will stop the SP's execution and kick it back to your application. –  valverij Apr 5 '13 at 14:42
    
Aaron its scaler-valued, exception would be validation based. –  MaxRecursion Apr 5 '13 at 14:45
2  
Haven't got 2012 here to test with but I don't think you can. What happens if you try? On previous versions trying to use RAISERROR would fail with Invalid use of a side-effecting operator 'RAISERROR' within a function. –  Martin Smith Apr 5 '13 at 15:19
    
@AaronBertrand see stackoverflow.com/questions/1485034/… how to handle this (+1 for pointing how to post such information) –  voo Apr 5 '13 at 19:33
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can do this by forcing an error condition when your validation fails, provided that isn't a possible error that might occur naturally. When you know a certain error can only occur when validation has failed, you can handle that in a custom way by checking for that error_number in your catch block. Example in tempdb:

USE tempdb;
GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.fXample(@i INT)
RETURNS TINYINT
AS
BEGIN
  RETURN (SELECT CASE WHEN @i < 10 -- change this to your "validation failed" condition
    THEN 1/0         -- something that will generate an error
    ELSE (SELECT @i) -- (you'd have your actual retrieval code here)
    END);
END
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.spXample
  @i INT
AS
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;
  BEGIN TRY
    SELECT dbo.fXample(@i);
  END TRY
  BEGIN CATCH
    IF ERROR_NUMBER() = 8134 -- divide by zero
    BEGIN
      THROW 50001, 'Your custom error message.', 1;
      -- you can throw any number > 50000 here
    END
    ELSE -- something else went wrong
    BEGIN
      THROW; -- throw original error
    END
  END CATCH
END
GO

Now try it out:

EXEC dbo.spXample @i = 10;  -- works fine
EXEC dbo.spXample @i = 6;   -- fails validation
EXEC dbo.spXample @i = 256; -- passes validation but overflows return

Results:

----
10

Msg 50001, Level 16, State 1, Procedure spXample, Line 12
Your custom error message.

Msg 220, Level 16, State 2, Procedure spXample, Line 7
Arithmetic overflow error for data type tinyint, value = 256.

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Thanks, but what ridiculous hoops we have to jump though to do something which is so simple! Just shows that SQL is a language of the past which simply isn't moving on. :( –  NickG Aug 9 '13 at 12:53
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