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For example, let's say that I have a table in PostgreSQL (higher than 9.0), filled with data:

row_id    percent    isrc
1         100        123iee43
2         100        1234wr32
3         98         123iee43
4         99         1234wr32
5         95         12313be3
6         99         12313be3
7         96         12313be3

I would like my result to contain ALL of the above rows grouped by column isrc and then entire groups ordered by percent, descending. So this is what the result should look like:

row_id    percent    isrc
1         100        123iee43
3         98         123iee43
2         100        1234wr32
4         99         1234wr32
6         99         12313be3
7         96         12313be3
5         95         12313be3

If I wanted ascending order, this is what I'd expect (I want to order only by the first row in one group, other rows in a single group do not matter):

row_id    percent    isrc
6         99         12313be3
7         96         12313be3
5         95         12313be3
1         100        123iee43
3         98         123iee43
2         100        1234wr32
4         99         1234wr32

I guess I must use window functions somehow but was unable to find the correct solution if one exists. Also, it would be really neat if the solution was as elegant as possible. :)

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Why do you display 123iee43 before 1234wr32 in the third listing? It should be the other way round. Also: how do you want to sort isrc? Ascending, Descending or not at all? This is relevant to break ties. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 5 '13 at 16:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Window function

SELECT row_id, percent, isrc
FROM   tbl
ORDER  BY max(percent) OVER(PARTITION BY isrc) DESC, isrc, percent DESC;

The aggregate function max() can be used as window function. I don't use ORDER BY in the window clause because, per documentation:

When an aggregate function is used as a window function, it aggregates over the rows within the current row's window frame. An aggregate used with ORDER BY and the default window frame definition produces a "running sum" type of behavior, which may or may not be what's wanted. To obtain aggregation over the whole partition, omit ORDER BY or use ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING. Other frame specifications can be used to obtain other effects.

Window function cannot be used in the WHERE or HAVING clause, because those are applied before the window function. But you can use one in the ORDER BY clause, which is applied last (even after DISTINCT, but before LIMIT).

Window functions can be expensive, but this one simplifies the query so much, it may even be faster than alternatives.
And it is certainly the most elegant.

Aggregate function

Plus JOIN. May or may not be faster.

SELECT row_id, percent, isrc
FROM   tbl
JOIN  (SELECT isrc, max(percent) AS max_pct FROM tbl GROUP BY 1) x USING (isrc)
ORDER  BY x.max_pct DESC, isrc, percent DESC;

DISTINCT ON

Very similar to using an aggregate function.

SELECT t.*
FROM   tbl t
JOIN  (
    SELECT DISTINCT ON (isrc) isrc, percent
    FROM   tbl
    ORDER  BY isrc, percent DESC
    ) s USING (isrc)
ORDER BY s.percent DESC, s.isrc, t.percent DESC

You don't need a window function here.

SQL Fiddle demonstrating all of the above.

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Really comprehensive answer! Thank you! –  Rok Dominko Apr 5 '13 at 17:38
    
@RokDominko: You're welcome. :) Would you be so kind as to run these alternatives (including Clodoaldo's) with EXPLAIN ANALYZE and report back on the performance (plus Postgres version and number of rows in your tables)? –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 5 '13 at 17:43

SQL Fiddle

select t.*
from
    t
    inner join (
        select distinct on (isrc) isrc,
            row_number() over(order by percent desc) rn
        from t
        order by isrc, percent desc
    ) s on t.isrc = s.isrc
order by s.rn, t.percent desc
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