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Please have a look at the following code

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Memory
{
private:
    int *memory;

public:
    Memory()
    {
        memory = new int[3];

        for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
        {
            memory[i] = i;
            cout << memory[i] << endl;
        }
    }

    ~Memory()
    {
        delete[] memory;
    }
};

int main()
{
    cout << "Running" << endl;

    Memory m;
    // do I have to invoke ~Memory() ?

    int *secondMemory = new int[5];
    //How to clear the memory of 'secondMemory' ?

    system("pause");
    return 0;


}

In here, I have cleared the memory of the dynamically allocated memory array in the class's destructor. But my questions are

  1. do I have to invoke ~Memory() ?
  2. How to clear the memory of 'secondMemory' ?

These questions are asked as comments in the appropriate places of the code. Please help!

Edit

The problem here is, if I delete the memory of 'secondMemory' in main(), then the memory is gone as soon as it is allocated!

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marked as duplicate by R. Martinho Fernandes, Lightness Races in Orbit, Abyx, Griwes, Zeta Apr 5 '13 at 15:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: No, my cat ate it. Why? –  Sniper Apr 5 '13 at 15:21
    
1  
Why are you worried about secondMemory being "gone as soon as it is allocated"? You are not using it anyway... If you were to do something with it, then obviously you would need to perform the release after using it. –  Luc Touraille Apr 5 '13 at 15:32
1  
@LucTouraille: Thanks for the reply. My mock paper has asked a question in this way. "What happens to the memory if we delete it?" is the question. –  Sniper Apr 5 '13 at 15:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

do I have to invoke ~Memory() ?

No, objects with automatic storage duration (like m) get destroyed when they go out of scope. In other words, the destructor is automatically called by the system. In this case, m gets destroyed upon returning from the main() function.

How to clear the memory of 'secondMemory' ?

Every object allocated with new must be destroyed through a corresponding call to delete, and every array allocated with new[] must be destroyed with a corresponding call to delete[]:

delete[] secondMemory;

Failing to do so results in memory leaks.

However, keep in mind that using raw pointers to perform manual memory management is regarded as a bad programming practice in Modern C++. Rather use standard containers, like std::vector<>, whenever you can.

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ok, but you mean I have to call it just after the memory allocation? I mean, just down the int *secondMemory = new int[5]; ? Then, the memory is allocated, and it is gone within mili seconds! –  Sniper Apr 5 '13 at 15:24
    
@Yohan: You have to deallocate the memory before you lose the last reference to it. In this case, you have to delete[] it before you return from main() (but you can do it any time before returning from main()). –  Andy Prowl Apr 5 '13 at 15:25
    
Btw, this "Modern C++" style thing consists of using RAII, which is a feature that was already in the language in the 1990s. Yes, it's that modern. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 5 '13 at 15:26
    
hmmm...OK, Thank you :) –  Sniper Apr 5 '13 at 15:28
    
@Andy I've been seeing a lot of claims that this is a bad practice lately. Do you have a definitive source for that? While I agree that it is overused and most cases could be replaced by a standard container, it is still a fundamental part of C++ memory management in general. I feel, especially for someone just learning the language, they should have a clear understanding of how this works before moving on to containers and other advanced concepts like RAII. –  Dave Rager Apr 5 '13 at 15:36

do I have to invoke ~Memory()

No, destructors are invoked automatically when the object falls out of scope.

How to clear the memory of 'secondMemory'?

Use delete[] secondMemory;

share|improve this answer
    
-1 for unsafe delete[]. –  Puppy Apr 5 '13 at 15:49
 Memory m;
// do I have to invoke ~Memory() ?

No this is not dynamically allocated so the compiler calls the destructor for you when m goes out of scope. In this case when main returns.

int *secondMemory = new int[5];
//How to clear the memory of 'secondMemory' ?

This is allocated dynamically so you have to deallocate it.

delete [] secondMemory;
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for unsafe delete[]. –  Puppy Apr 5 '13 at 15:44
    
@DeadMG How please explain. –  user995502 Apr 5 '13 at 15:45
1  
@DeadMG none of those apply in the example code given. I believe your downvotes are unfair and stating that it is unsafe is misleading. –  Dave Rager Apr 5 '13 at 16:45
1  
@DeadMG Those points are beyond the scope of this question - it's a shame you downvoted all the answers on that basis. –  JBentley Apr 5 '13 at 19:19
1  
@DeadMG drawing your sword on a fly here :) –  user995502 Apr 5 '13 at 19:20

do I have to invoke ~Memory() ?

When the object goes out of scope, ~Memory() will automatically be invoked. So no, you don't have to do anything to invoke it manually.

How to clear the memory of 'secondMemory' ?

Just use

delete [] secondMemory

since you initialized int* secondMemory using new and [].

share|improve this answer
    
-1 for unsafe delete[]. –  Puppy Apr 5 '13 at 15:55

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